Author Topic: Safety: Glove Selection Link  (Read 2064 times)

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grellobanans

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Safety: Glove Selection Link
« on: January 14, 2004, 10:30:00 PM »
Found this in my internet travels. Safety is always good. Appropriate types of gloves for various chems.

http://www.ehs.cornell.edu/lrs/chp/11.glove.selec.htm



Excerpt:
Acetic acid (glacial or concentrated solutions):  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); neoprene or butyl rubber gloves are recommended if contact with acetic acid above 10% is probable for an extended period of time.

Acetic anhydride:  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact)   Acetic anhydride is very corrosive to human tissues (skin, eyes, mucus membranes) and a poison by inhalation.  For handling larger quantities of pure material only  heavier weight (.28-.33 mm) butyl rubber or neoprene gloves are recommended.

Acetone:  heavier weight (8 mil)  natural rubber (incidental contact);  for extended contact with acetone the only  recommended glove type is butyl rubber. 

If you are cleaning parts with acetone, or have any other use of acetone where there is more than incidental contact, you must  use butyl rubber gloves.  Natural rubber gloves have about a 10 minute breakthrough time and are for incidental contact only.  Nitrile gloves have a less than four minute breakthrough time and are not recommended  for any use of acetone.

Acetonitrile:  nitrile gloves or double glove with nitrile gloves (incidental contact)  

For transfer of acetonitrile or for large scale use, only  heavier weight butyl rubber or poplyvinyl acetate gloves are recommended.  Acetonitrile permeates though disposable latex exam gloves in a matter of seconds and latex gloves should never  be used to handle this material. 

Acrylamide: nitrile gloves or double glove with nitrile gloves (incidental contact); butyl rubber gloves are recommended for extended contact (such as repackaging pure acrylamide into smaller containers)

Acrylamide is readily absorbed through unbroken skin.  Acrylamide is a carcinogen, mutagen, teratogen and a potent neurotoxin with no known antidote, so adequate hand protection is essential when using this chemical. Note that once acrylamide solutions are polymerized the resulting gels are no longer hazardous and, assuming that they are not contaminated with other hazardous materials, they may be disposed of in the ordinary trash.

Note:  See Heavy Metal Salts for proper disposal of gloves and other dry waste contaminated with acrylamide.

bis- Acrylamide:  nitrile gloves

 

bis- Acrylamide (N,N’-dihydroxy-ethylene-bis-acrylamide) does not share the more

extreme toxic characteristics of acrylamide.  However, its toxicological properties have not been fully investigated  and it should be treated as a hazardous material.

 

Alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium):  nitrile gloves

Note:  It is very important that all work with alkali metals be conducted in the absence of water.  Water forms hydrogen gas on contact with alkali metals.  As this is a very exothermic reaction, working with alkali metals presents a severe fire hazard.  All labs working with alkali metals must have a Class D fire extinguisher available.

Ammonium hydroxide:  nitrile gloves; for extended contact heavier weight neoprene or butyl rubber gloves are superior to nitrile gloves 

Benzotriazole, 1,2,3-:  nitrile gloves

Butanol (and isomers):  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); for extended contact, heavier weight butyl rubber or nitrile gloves are recommended

Butyric acid: nitrile gloves (incidental contact); butyl rubber or neoprene gloves are recommended if contact with butyric acid is probable for an extended period of time.

Carbon disulfide: double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves; remove outer glove at once if exposed to carbon disulfide

Most nitrile gloves have a breakthrough time of only 8 to 20 minutes and thus offer little protection when exposed to carbon disulfide.   For operations involving the use of larger amounts of carbon disulfide, when transferring carbon disulfide from one container to another or for other potentially extended contact, the only  gloves recommended are viton and polyvinyl acetate (PVA).

Carbon tetrachloride:  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves; remove outer glove at once if exposed to carbon tetrachloride

Most nitrile gloves have a breakthrough time of only a few minutes and thus offer little protection when exposed to carbon tetrachloride.   For operations involving the use of larger amounts of carbon tetrachloride, when transferring carbon tetrachloride from one container to another or for other potentially extended contact, the only  gloves recommended are viton.  Viton gloves are expensive, but they are the standard glove to use with carbon tetrachloride.

Carbon tetrachloride is a poison, carcinogen, mutagen and teratogen.  It is readily absorbed through unbroken skin.  Alcohol and acetone are known to enhance the toxicity of carbon tetrachloride.  The dose required to cause poisoning in humans varies significantly, with the ingestion of as little as 2 ml. having caused death. Carbon tetrachloride is also a substantial ozone depleting chemical and its use has been banned commercially.  If you can find a substitute for carbon tetrachloride, it is strongly recommended that you use an alternative material.

Catechol:  nitrile gloves

Chloroform:  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves; remove outer glove at once if exposed to chloroform

Thin (3-4 mil) Nitrile gloves have a 4 minute breakthrough time and thus offer little protection when exposed to chloroform.   For operations involving the use of larger amounts of chloroform, such as transferring chloroform from one container to another or for large-scale extractions, etc., the only  gloves recommended are viton or polyvinyl acetate (PVA).   Viton gloves are expensive, but they are the standard glove to use with chloroform.

Chlorosulfuron:  nitrile gloves

Cobalt chloride:  See Heavy Metal Salts.

Copper (cupric) sulfate:  nitrile gloves

Cryogenic liquids (liquid nitrogen, argon, helium, etc.):  Cryogenic materials handling-rated gloves.  Cryo-Gloves®, made by Tempshield, Inc., are highly recommended.  Note that these gloves are made for handling very cold objects, but that they are not for immersion in liquid nitrogen or other extended contact with cryogenic liquids.

3,3'-Diaminobenzidine (DAB):  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); double glove with nitrile gloves when handling the pure material or concentrated stock solutions 

Note:  See Heavy Metal Salts for proper disposal of gloves and other dry waste contaminated with DBA.

Diazomethane in ether (a derivatizing reagent): double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves; remove outer glove at once if exposed to diazomethane in ether.

For possible extended contact, such as when transferring diazomethane in ether or when making reagent solutions containing this material, the only  recommended glove would be a Norfoil glove, due to the extreme hazards associated with this material.  Diazomethane is an extreme poison, a cancer suspect agent, extremely flammable, easily detonated and has an autoignition temperature of 100° C. (an  ordinary light bulb would cause a sufficient quantity of the vapor in air to autodetonate).  This is easily one of the most dangerous materials in use in labs at Cornell.  If there is any way you can substitute another material for diazomethane in ether it is strongly recommended that you do so.

Dichloromethane:  See Methylene Chloride.

2,4-Dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D):  nitrile gloves

Diethyl pyrocarbonate:  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); double glove with nitrile gloves when handling the pure material or concentrated stock solutions 

Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO):  heavier weight natural rubber gloves (15-18 mil; not  4 mil latex exam gloves) (incidental contact);  butyl rubber gloves are recommended for extended contact; if you are allergic to natural latex products you may double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) disposable nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves; remove outer glove at once if exposed to DMSO.

Nitrile gloves are not  recommended for use with DMSO if extended contact with the hands is expected.  Some brands of nitrile gloves have degradation times of five minutes when used with DMSO.  DMSO freely penetrates the skin and may carry dissolved chemicals with it into the body, so hand protection is especially important if you are working with any hazardous materials dissolved in DMSO.

1,4-Dioxane (dioxane): double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves; remove outer glove at once if exposed to dioxane

Most nitrile gloves have a breakthrough time of only a few minutes and thus offer little protection when exposed to dioxane.   For operations involving the use of larger amounts of dioxane, when transferring dioxane from one container to another or for other potentially extended contact, the only  gloves recommended are butyl rubber gloves.  Dioxane is one of the few commonly used lab chemicals that readily degrades viton gloves.

Dioxane is only moderately toxic, but it is a listed carcinogen, mutagen and teratogen.  It is readily absorbed through unbroken skin so hand protection is especially important when working with this material.

Dithiothreitol (Cleland's Reagent):  nitrile gloves

Ethanol:  nitrile gloves

Ethidium bromide (EtBr):  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); double glove with nitrile gloves when handling the pure material or concentrated stock solutions

Note:  See Heavy Metal Salts for proper disposal of gloves and other dry waste contaminated with EtBr

Ethyl acetate: double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact)

Nitrile gloves are not serviceable for extended contact as even heavy weight nitrile gloves (36 mil) have a breakthrough time of only 8 minutes and thus offer little protection when exposed to ethyl acetate. For operations involving the use of larger amounts of ethyl acetate, when transferring ethyl acetate from one container to another or for other potentially extended contact, the only  gloves recommended are butyl rubber and polyvinyl acetate (PVA).

Ethyl ether (diethyl ether, ether): double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves; remove outer glove at once if exposed to ether

Ether is one of those chemicals that attacks almost all known commonly used glove materials.

It permeates through viton, butyl rubber, neoprene, nitrile and natural rubber in a matter of minutes.  The only  recommended glove material for extended contact is polyvinyl acetate (PVA), such as the PVA™ brand made by Ansell Edmont.

Formaldehyde:  nitrile gloves

Formamide:  nitrile gloves (incidental contact);  butyl rubber gloves are the only  gloves recommended for direct contact with the pure material.

Formamide is often used in the pure form.  If you use pure formamide in a procedure where there is probable contact with the skin, it is strongly recommended  that you wear butyl rubber gloves.

Formic acid:  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) Formic acid is very corrosive to human tissues (skin, eyes, mucus membranes).  For handling larger quantities of pure material only  heavier weight (.28-.33 mm) butyl rubber or neoprene gloves are recommended. 

Gallic acid:  nitrile gloves 

Geneticin:  nitrile gloves 

Glutaraldehyde:  nitrile gloves 

Heavy metal salts (especially those that are easily soluble in water):  nitrile gloves or double glove in some cases*

For most inorganic  (ionic) salts of heavy metals the human skin is usually an effective barrier against absorption of the heavy metal ions.  If there are cracks in the skin, areas of inflammation, insect bites, cuts or other breaches of the integrity of the skin, heavy metal ions may be passed directly through the skin.   The salts of many heavy metals are toxic or highly toxic and rated as poisons:  arsenic, bismuth, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, nickel, osmium, silver and uranium.  Some of these materials are also listed as corrosives (chromium trioxide), inhalation hazards (osmium tetroxide), known or suspect carcinogens and mutagens (lead and lead salts, mercury and its salts, etc.) or radioactive (uranium). Disposable nitrile gloves are generally acceptable for the use of the pure salts and stock (concentrated) or dilute solutions for the common salts of the above metals (acetates, chlorides, sulfates, nitrates, anhydrides, oxides, hydroxides, etc.) where only incidental contact  will be made with these materials or their solutions.

Several heavy metal salts are more easily absorbed by the skin than others.  Osmium tetroxide is readily absorbed by the skin and is very toxic.  Lead acetate is absorbed 1-1/2 times more easily than other lead salts.

Mercuric chloride can be absorbed fairly easily, especially if there are cracks, cuts or other breaks in the skin.  It is also very toxic.  It is recommended to *double glove* with nitrile gloves when using these materials, especially when handing the pure compounds or their strong solutions.

It is important that used gloves, and other dry materials, contaminated with heavy metals are not  disposed of in the ordinary trash.   Place all heavy metal contaminated gloves in a separate waste stream (container).  The College of Veterinary Medicine maintains a Medical Waste Program.  Gloves (and other dry waste items) contaminated with trace amounts of heavy metals may be sent to the Vet College for disposal.  EH&S can furnish the guidelines provided by the Vet College or you may contact Dr. Larry Thompson at 253-3966 or Denver Metzler at 253-3288 for information on this program.  It is important that the materials being disposed of are clearly identified on the Medical Waste Tracking Tag you will be required to complete as part of the disposal process, such as "Trace contaminated with lead acetate."  (Note that this method of disposal is also acceptable for trace contaminated gloves and other dry waste generated from the use of carcinogens, mutagens and other materials that can not be disposed of in the ordinary trash.)  Uncontaminated or decontaminated gloves may be disposed of as ordinary trash.

grellobanans

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continued
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2004, 10:32:00 PM »
Heptane:  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves

For extended contact, as when using heptane for large scale extractions, refilling secondary containers or as a cleaning fluid, a heavier weight nitrile (35 mils or thicker), viton or PVA gloves are recommended. Note that the permeation time for heptane through 4 mil nitrile gloves is about 8 minutes and through latex exam gloves is even less time; subsequently, these gloves are not recommended  for use with heptane.

Hexamethylenediamine (1,6-diaminohexane): heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact); use a heavier weight neoprene glove when handling the pure material or concentrated stock solutions (extended contact)

Hexane:  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves

For extended contact, as when using hexane for large scale extractions, refilling secondary containers or as a cleaning fluid, a heavier weight nitrile (35 mils or thicker), viton or PVA gloves are recommended. Note that the permeation time for hexane through 4 mil nitrile gloves is about 12 minutes and through latex exam gloves is only about 5-6 minutes; subsequently, these gloves are not recommended  for use with hexane.

Hydrochloric acid (concentrated and strong solutions):  nitrile gloves (incidental contact)

A heavier weight neoprene or butyl rubber glove would be superior for long-term use with more concentrated solutions, such as cleaning glassware that has been soaking in an HCl bath or other larger-scale use of HCl.

Hydrofluoric acid (HF):  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves

Note that additional protective equipment must always be worn when using larger quantities of HF.  Nitrile or rubber sleeves, rubber aprons, face shields and splash goggles (not  safety glasses) should also be worn.  All users of HF must maintain an HF first aid kit in their lab.

HF users are advised to contact EH&S for an “HF Users Information Packet.”

Hypophosphorous acid:  double glove with nitrile gloves (4 mil) (incidental contact) or use 8 mil or heavier nitrile gloves

Kananmycin:  nitrile gloves

Isoamyl alcohol:  nitrile gloves

Isoctane:  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); for extended contact heavier weight nitrile gloves are recommended

Isopropanol:  nitrile gloves

Lactic Acid: nitrile gloves (incidental contact); double glove with nitrile gloves or use neoprene or butyl rubber gloves if contact with lactic acid is probable for an extended period

Laser dyes:  nitrile gloves

Lead acetate:  See Heavy Metal Salts.

2-Mercaptoethanol:

Mercuric chloride:  See Heavy Metal Salts.

Mercury:  nitrile gloves

Methanol (methyl alcohol):  nitrile gloves

Methanol should never be allowed to make contact with the skin, as it is fairly easily absorbed by the skin.  Methanol is a poison.

Methylene chloride:  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact)

Methylene chloride will permeate through thin (3-4 mil) nitrile gloves in four minutes or less.  If you are double gloved, as recommended, and you splash or spill methylene chloride on your gloves, stop what you are doing and change the outer glove immediately.   If you allow methylene chloride to remain on the outer nitrile glove for more than two to four minutes you must discard both sets of gloves and re-double glove.  Methylene chloride permeates disposable latex exam gloves in a matter of seconds and latex gloves should never  be used to handle this material.

For use of methylene chloride where contact with the glove is anticipated, such as stripping paint or gluing plastics, only   polyvinyl acetate (PVA) or viton gloves are recommended.  These gloves come in .28-.33 mm thickness.  PVA offers the best protection.

Methylphosphonic acid:  double glove with nitrile gloves (4 mil) (incidental contact) or use 8 mil or heavier nitrile gloves

Methyl sulfonic acid, ethyl ester (EMS) (ethyl methanesulfonate):  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); double glove with nitrile gloves when handling the pure material or concentrated stock solutions 

Note:  See Heavy Metal Salts for proper disposal of gloves and other dry waste contaminated with EMS.

Monoethanolamine:  nitrile gloves

Nickel chloride:    See Heavy Metal Salts.

Nitric acid:  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact); remove outer glove at once if exposed to nitric  acid

Light weight nitrile gloves are not recommended for any use with nitric acid as they are degraded very quickly.  Even heavier weight nitrile gloves last only five minutes or less in contact with nitric acid.  For handling larger quantities of concentrated nitric acid, or for extended contact, only  heavier weight (.28-.33 mm) butyl rubber or neoprene gloves are recommended.

N-Methylethanolamine: :  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact); remove outer glove at once if exposed to N-methylethanolamine

Viton, neoprene or butyl rubber gloves are recommended for extensive use of N-methyl-ethanolamine such as working with the pure material or making solutions.

Octane: nitrile gloves (incidental contact); for extended contact heavier weight nitrile gloves or viton gloves are recommended

Organophosphorous compounds:  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves

Osmium tetroxide:  See Heavy Metal Salts.

Paraformaldehyde:  nitrile gloves

Pentane: double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact)

Thin nitrile gloves are quickly degraded by pentane.  For extended contact with pentane only heavier weight neoprene gloves or viton gloves are recommended.

Pesticides:  heavier weight unlined nitrile gloves (8-20 mils) or a glove specified by the pesticide label.*

A wide variety of pesticides are in use at Cornell.  Each EPA registered pesticide is provided with an MSDS-like label.  The pesticide label may have a glove selection category listed on the it which is based on the “EPA Chemical Resistance Category Selection Chart.”  The glove selection category is listed as A through H, with each category representing a group or class of pesticides.

The EPA glove selection chart is available on the Web at:

http://oeh.cals.cornell.edu/EPAChemRes.html

 

If the label specifies a glove type, the applicator must  wear the specified glove.  Additional information on the selection of gloves for the use of various pesticides may be obtained from Mary-Lynn Cummings at 255-2557 or the Pesticide Management Education Program at 255-1866

Perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene): Double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact); remove outer glove at once if exposed to perchloroethylene.

For extended contact, such as parts washing, heavier weight nitrile gloves (22 mil or heavier, such as Ansell Edmont Sol-Vex brand, #37-165) may last up to five hours.

Viton gloves are recommended for repeated extended contact with perchloroethylene.

Thin (4 mil) nitile gloves have a breakthrough time of 4 minutes or less.;  neoprene and vinyl glove have a breakthrough time of less than 10 minutes; none of these materials are suitable for use with perchloroethylene.

Petroleum ether:  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); or heavy weight nitrile or viton for extended contact.

Phenol:  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact); neoprene or butyl rubber gloves are recommended for extensive use of phenol such as working with the pure material or making solutions.

Nitrile gloves have a 30-minute breakthrough time with phenol.  If working with double gloved nitrile gloves, change the outer glove frequently if exposed to this material. 

Phenol-chloroform mixtures:  Double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves; remove outer glove at once  if exposed to mixture.

Viton gloves are recommended for work with phenol-chloroform mixtures when probable exposure to  the mixtures exists (extended contact), such as when making up the mixtures. 

Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF):  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); double glove with nitrile gloves when handling the pure material or concentrated stock solutions 

Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride is corrosive (causes burns) on contact with the skin, eyes and mucus membranes.  It is also a highly toxic cholinesterase inhibitor and central nervous system poison.  Avoid all contact.

Note:  See Heavy Metal Salts for proper disposal of gloves and other dry waste contaminated with PMSF.

Phosphonic acid:  double glove with nitrile gloves (4 mil) (incidental contact) or use 8 mil or heavier nitrile gloves

Phosphoric acid:  double glove with nitrile gloves (4 mil) (incidental contact) or use 8 mil or heavier nitrile gloves

Picloram (4-amino-3,5,6-trichloropicolinic aicd):  nitrile glove 

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs):  For weighing out of pure or concentrated materials, wear an 8 mil or heavier nitrile glove over a neoprene glove.  For dilute solutions in corn oil  (1 p.p.m. or less) neoprene gloves (20 mil) are recommended. 

Note:  See Heavy Metal Salts for proper disposal of gloves and other dry waste contaminated with PCBs. 

Polyoxyethylenesorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20):  nitrile gloves 

Potassium ferricyanide:  nitrile gloves 

Potassium ferrocyanide:  nitrile gloves 

Potassium permanganate: nitrile gloves 

Propanol:  nitrile gloves 

Propionic acid:  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); neoprene or butyl rubber gloves are recommended if contact with propionic acid is probable for an extended period of time. 

Propylene oxide:  heavier weight (17 mil or greater) butyl rubber or neoprene gloves (incidental contact); norfoil gloves are the only  glove recommended for extended contact 

Propylene oxide attacks almost all common glove materials.  It passes directly through latex gloves and the breakthrough time for nitrile gloves ranges from seconds to a few minutes.

Ordinary 4 mil latex and nitrile lab gloves should never  be used with this material.  Propylene oxide has a breakthrough time of only 10 minutes with viton gloves which are completely resistant to most common lab chemicals.  The breakthrough time for neoprene and butyl rubber gloves is on the order of 45-50 minutes.  Use heavier weight gloves (17 mil or greater), check the gloves often and discard after 40 minutes or so or of continuous use when there is contact  of propylene oxide with the glove.  When possible, use a norfoil glove with a heavier weight  (8 mil) nitrile 

Psoralen:  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); double glove with nitrile gloves when handling the pure material or concentrated stock solutions   Psoralen is corrosive (causes burns) on contact with the skin, eyes and mucus membranes.  It is anticipated to be a carcinogen, it is a mutagen and a strong photosensitizer.  Avoid all contact. 

Note:  See Heavy Metal Salts for proper disposal of gloves and other dry waste contaminated with psoralen.

Pump oil:  butyl rubber gloves
If you are changing pump oil or servicing pumps where contact with the oil may occur, the only recommended glove type is butyl rubber. 

Silane based silanization or drivatization compounds:  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves; remove outer glove at once if signs of degradation occur 

Silver nitrate: See Heavy Metal Salts. 

Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS):  nitrile gloves 

Sodium azide:  nitrile gloves or double glove with nitrile gloves (incidental contact) 

Spermidine: nitrile gloves  Sulfuric acid: heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact); heavier weight (20 mil or greater) neoprene or butyl rubbber gloves (extended contact) 

Sulfuric acid: heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact); heavier weight (20 mil or greater) neoprene or butyl rubbber gloves (extended contact) 

Tetrahydrofuran (THF): double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves; remove outer glove at once if THF contacts glove 

For extended contact, such as when using THF for larger scale reactions, refilling secondary containers or as a cleaning fluid, only  Norfoil gloves are recommended.  Polyvinyl acetate (PVA) gives some limited protection (up to 1-1/2 hours for some gloves) but are inferior to the Norfoil gloves.  Note that the permeation time for THF through 4 mil nitrile gloves and latex exam gloves is almost instantaneous; subsequently, these gloves are not recommended  for use with THF. 

3,3',5,5'-Tetramethylbenzidine (TMB):  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); double glove with nitrile gloves when handling the pure material or concentrated stock solutions   

Note:  See Heavy Metal Salts for proper disposal of gloves and other dry waste contaminated with TMB. 

N, N, N’, N’-Tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED):  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); double glove with nitrile gloves when handling the pure material or concentrated stock solutions  TEMED is corrosive (causes burns) on contact with the skin, eyes and mucus membranes.

grellobanans

  • Guest
final
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2004, 10:33:00 PM »
Timetin:  nitrile gloves 

Toluene:  double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact) or use 15 mil or heavier nitrile gloves; remove outer glove at once if exposed to toluene 

For extended contact, such as when using toluene for larger scale reactions, refilling secondary containers or as a cleaning fluid, only  viton or polyvinyl acetate (PVA) gloves are recommended. Note that the permeation time for toluene through 4 mil nitrile gloves is less than 4 minutes and through latex exam gloves is less than that; subsequently, these gloves are not recommended  for use with toluene.  

Trichloroethylene: double glove with heavier weight (8 mil) nitrile gloves (incidental contact); remove outer glove at once if exposed to trichloroethylene 

For extended contact, such as when using trichloroethylene for larger scale reactions, refilling secondary containers or as a cleaning fluid, only  viton or polyvinyl acetate (PVA) gloves are recommended.  Note that the permeation time for trichloroethylene through even heavy weight nitrile gloves (36 mil) is 4 minutes, and only 10 minutes for even heavier butyl rubber gloves (64 mil).  The permeation time for thin nitrile or latex exam gloves (3-4 mil) is on the order of a minute or two; subsequently, these gloves are not recommended  for use with toluene.  

Trichloromethyl chloroformate (diphosgene):  This chemical, usually supplied in sealed glass ampules, is very  air/moisture reactive,  a corrosive and it is considered to be highly toxic by all routes of exposure.   It must be used in a vented glove box or environmental chamber under dry nitrogen or argon.  Glove boxes are usually fitted with substantial butyl rubber gloves, however, one manufacturer recommends that “heavy” gloves be worn over the glove box gloves.  I would recommend using 8 mil or heavier nirtile gloves over the butyl rubber glove box gloves.  Please contact EH&S if you have any questions concerning the special procedures required for the use of this chemical. 

Triton-X100:  nitrile gloves 

Valeric acid:  nitrile gloves (incidental contact); double glove with nitrile gloves or use neoprene or butyl rubber gloves if contact with valeric acid is probable for an extended period 

Xylene:  nitrile gloves (incidental contact)  For use of xylene where contact with the glove is anticipated, such as pouring of new or used xylene into containers or other operations, polyvinyl acetate (PVA) or viton gloves are recommended.

Definitions 

Breakthrough is the time elapsed between the initial contact with a chemical and its detection inside a glove.  Breakthrough time is directly proportional to glove material thickness for most materials. 

Butyl rubber is a synthetic rubber (butylene and isoprene copolymer) that provides the highest permeation resistance to gases and water vapor of any protective material used to make gloves.  Butyl rubber is an excellent choice for protection against esters and ketones, especially for extended contact with acetone. 

Degradation is a change in one or more of the physical properties of a glove due to chemical contact.  Some of these changes,  such as discoloring, swelling, shrinkage or stiffness, may be  visually detected but others are invisible.  Degradation almost always results in a loss of performance of a glove and is an indicator of how long a glove will last.  Degradation is usually detected by a change in weight of a glove and degradation ratings are often based on % change in weight over time.   

Double gloving (see introduction, above) is the use of two layers of gloves to provide improved hand protection when using certain hazardous chemicals. This affords a double layer of protection.   If the outer glove starts to degrade or tears open, the inner glove continues to offer protection until the gloves are removed and replaced.

Gauge or thickness of gloves is generally measured in mils.  Higher gauge (thicker) gloves generally offer more protection.   Generally speaking, doubling the thickness halves the permeation rate. 

Finish refers to the surface texture of a glove material.  Most laboratory gloves have a smooth finish.  Textured surfaces are added to glove materials to provide a better grip on objects being handled. 

Flock lining is a natural or synthetic shredded fiber that covers the inside of a glove to provide comfort by absorbing perspiration and providing ease in putting on and removing the glove.

 Hypalon is a synthetic polymer that offers superior resistance to oxidizing agents and ozone.  It is frequently used for glove box gloves. 

Lower detection limit (LDL) is the minimum level detected with analytical test equipment, measured in parts per million (ppm) detected at breakthrough time. 

Mil is the standard unit for measuring the gauge or thickness of glove materials.  A mil is one- thousandth of an inch or 0.001”.  A millimeter is 39.37 mils; a mil is .00254 mm. 

Natural rubber (or latex), produced from the sap of certain species of tropical trees, is used to make gloves that are suitable for the handling of biological materials, human blood and other body fluids, electronics assembly, food service and other applications  where the work  needs to be kept clean.   Latex gloves are generally not suitable for use with most laboratory chemicals (see introduction, above).   Latex products are also a health concern because of their protein component, to which many people are allergic.  Natural rubber is often blended with other polymers to achieve various characteristics of those materials. 

Neoprene is a synthetic rubber that is especially resistant to oils and petroleum products.  It is also good for corrosives, alcohols and many solvents.  Neoprene is probably the best substitute material for the replacement of latex gloves for janitorial services, shop workers, mechanics and other trades.

Nitrile, also referred to as NBR or acrylonitrile-butadiene, offers superior chemical resistance as well as puncture and abrasion resistance.  4 and 8 mil nitrile gloves are most often specified for general lab use for handling a wide variety of chemicals. 

Norfoil (see introduction, above) is a lightweight, flexible laminate of several layers of polymers which offers superior resistance to permeation by a wide range of hazardous materials which often quickly degrade other glove materials.  They are often used as an underglove with a tighter fitting glove of another material as an overglove to restore dexterity.  Brand names of Norfoil gloves are Silver Shield by North Hand Protection, 4H by Safety4, and New Barrier™  brand by Ansell Edmont. 

Overglove is a glove worn over another glove (underglove) when double gloving to provide multiple layers of resistance to hazardous chemicals.  The overglove protects the underglove from chemical degradation and permeation.  It is changed out when it begins to be chemically attacked to protect the underglove. 

Penetration is the nonchemical transport of a chemical through a glove, usually by pinholes or microscopic tears or cracks resulting from degradation. 

Permeation is the process by which a chemical passes through a glove’s protective film.  Permeation occurs at the molecular level and often leaves the appearance of the glove unchanged.

The rate of permeation  of a chemical through a glove is one of the determining factors in the effectiveness of a glove for use with a particular chemical.  Generally speaking, the permeation rate is inversely proportional to thickness (gauge), although the length of time of exposure and temperature can be important factors for some glove materials.  Permeation is an indicator of how long gloves are safe to wear. 

Permeation rate at steady state is the maximum rate at which a chemical passes through a glove material, usually expressed in milligrams per square meter per second (mg./m.2/sec.). 

Permeation breakthrough is the time in minutes it takes for a chemical to permeate through a glove.  Generally speaking, doubling the thickness of a glove quadruples breakthrough time. 

Polyvinyl alcohol, or PVA, gloves give superior service for handling solvents, such as chloroform, that attack most other glove materials.   PVA is water soluble and may not be used with any  water-based materials. 

Powdered gloves have an interior coating of cornstarch or other absorbent material.   Powdered gloves are usually easier to take on and off and are often more comfortable for the wearer, but the powder may contribute to allergic responses in some individuals. 

Supported means that the polymer of the glove is a coating over a fabric liner.  This two- component glove style offers more durable hand protection.  Very few gloves for laboratory use are supported.   

Underglove is a glove worn under another glove (overglove) when double gloving to provide multiple layers of resistance to hazardous chemicals. 

Unsupported means that a glove is made only of a pure polymer or mix of polymers.  Unsupported gloves tend to offer greater dexterity and tactile sensitivity but less protection from physical damage.

Vinyl or polyvinyl chloride (PVC) gloves are economical substitutes for latex gloves for food service or assembly work but they are not resistant to many common laboratory chemicals and are not recommended for general laboratory work.

Viton is a very chemically resistant fluoroelastomer synthetic rubber.  It protects against PCBs, benzene, aniline and most chlorinated and aromatic solvents.  For some chemicals, such as chloroform, it is the only resistant material commonly available.  Viton gloves are expensive, but they have a very long lifespan.