Author Topic: ethoxide question.  (Read 2581 times)

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WHITE_DEVIL

  • Guest
ethoxide question.
« on: November 19, 2002, 09:59:00 AM »
sodium added to ethanol creates sodium ethoxide.
can this be done with any other alcohols?
Methanol?

pHarmacist

  • Guest
Yes
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2002, 10:04:00 AM »
...

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WHITE_DEVIL

  • Guest
Thanks is it possible to make 'sodium methoxide' ...
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2002, 10:40:00 AM »
Thanks
is it possible to make 'sodium methoxide' and use this turn say, 2,5 di bromo benzaldehyde to 2,5 dimethoxy benzaldehyde (+ 2NaBr)
Also can this be done with other group 1 metals such as Li?

pHarmacist

  • Guest
No
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2002, 10:58:00 AM »
...

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Kreist

  • Guest
Ethoxides....
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2002, 11:07:00 AM »
are used for transethylation of ester groups. Free hydroxy groups will not be methylated. Maybe you could use a quartenary ammonium salt for that?

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but it is the journey that matters, in the end.

raffike

  • Guest
And there is sodium isopropoxide aswell
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2002, 02:56:00 PM »
And there is sodium isopropoxide aswell

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Rhodium

  • Guest
The reaction is valid, but with some modifications
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2002, 04:08:00 PM »
You could protect the aldehyde function of 2,5-dibromobenzaldehyde as the acetal, then react it with an excess of sodium methoxide in methanol using a catalytic amount of Copper(I)bromide, followed by hydrolysis of the acetal to get 2,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde.

Both instructions for acetal formation and methoxylation can be found at my page, but exemplified for 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde and 5-bromovanillin respectively.