Author Topic: 0.1N and 1 N are dilutions?  (Read 1546 times)

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violethorn

  • Guest
0.1N and 1 N are dilutions?
« on: August 24, 2004, 10:11:00 PM »
What does the 0.1N and 1N refer to when placed in front of a substance? For instance- 0.1N HCl. Am I correct in assuming it refers to dilution?

Snakebyte

  • Guest
N short for normal and is used to tell how...
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2004, 01:04:00 AM »
N short for normal and is used to tell how concentrated your solution is.  I believe there is a table on Rhodium's site that tells how to make 1N and 3N of common aqueous solutions.


hest

  • Guest
Normal
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2004, 08:04:00 AM »
The Normal term refer to the 'active' ingredient.
so 1N HCl is the Same as 1M HCl
But 1N H2SO4 is only 0.5M H2SO4

Today wee only use the M (molar) notation. (wath is the molar consentration of an 1N permanganate solution ?? if you dont know the pH there are two right ansers. That why M make more sence)

r2e3

  • Guest
my take
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2004, 10:05:00 PM »
is

refers to the availability of H+ ions

HCl = 1 (1 H+)
H2so4 = 0.5 (2H+)

So one has double the amount of ions available as the other.

that notation is still common in a lot of labs.

psyloxy

  • Guest
My try at explaining it: Post 527506 ...
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2004, 12:29:00 AM »
My try at explaining it:

Post 527506

(psyloxy: "3 N means : the concentration of protons ...", Newbee Forum)


--psyloxy--

methyl_ethyl

  • Guest
Normality
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2004, 02:10:00 AM »
Normality has to do with the number of equivalents of solute in a litre of solution.

There can be two different definitions of "equivalents" if we are speaking of acid/base chemistry then if is defined as the mass of a substance that donates or accepts one mole of protons.  As mentioned before sulfuric acid is diprotic, therefore one half of a mole of H2SO4 donates one mole of protons.

In redox chemistry an equivalent is the mass of a substance that donates or accepts one mole of electrons.

Using Normality to describe the concentration of a solution is very common in my part of the world. 

I am sure this has all bee said before,

EDIT[\red]I will also add that in my limited experience many if not all "standard volumetric solutions" i.e. highly pure, solutions used in standardization, and what not, are usually expressed as normal solutions.  I can personally say that I have not seen many volumetric standard solutions expressed in Molarity.  This is not to say of course that it does not exist but I will speak from my own experience and feel confident that most of the standard solutions offered to myself are expressed in equivalents of solute or Normality.  i.e. 12 Normal HCL, dilute 500mL 12N HCL with 500mL H2[/bub]O to yield 6N HCL. 
regards,

m_e