Author Topic: Microwave Chemistry on the Web -Cherrie Baby  (Read 985 times)

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Microwave Chemistry on the Web -Cherrie Baby
« on: April 19, 2000, 09:02:00 AM »

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Author  Topic:   Microwave Chemistry on the Web 
Cherrie Baby
Member   posted 04-11-98 10:16 PM          
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Microwave Chemistry - Learn all about it. 

http://www.ed.ac.uk/~ah05/microwave.html

  

http://www.cyf-kr.edu.pl/~pcbogdal/

 

The second site has 3 papers that you can download. One of these describes the synthesis of phenolic ethers in seconds.


 
Fan of Shulgin
Member   posted 04-14-98 07:12 AM          
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I dont want to sound dismissive, but microwave chemistry should only be carried out unsupervised by an *experienced* microwave chemist. Although the principles surrounding the modifications of mass production microwave ovens are clear, any modifications should only be carried out by someone with professional qualifications and safety monitoring equipment. Although in many reactions it can give excellent results - it is a field still in its infancy and is not something that should be attempted by am, amateurs - even in their dreams!
Sorry to sound so negative, I just dont want any little bees to be nuked by their own dreamstate experiments! 


 
Fan of Shulgin
Member   posted 04-14-98 07:12 AM          
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I dont want to sound dismissive, but microwave chemistry should only be carried out unsupervised by an *experienced* microwave chemist. Although the principles surrounding the modifications of mass production microwave ovens are clear, any modifications should only be carried out by someone with professional qualifications and safety monitoring equipment. Although in many reactions it can give excellent results - it is a field still in its infancy and is not something that should be attempted by am, amateurs - even in their dreams!
Sorry to sound so negative, I just dont want any little bees to be nuked by their own dreamstate experiments! 


 
Cherrie Baby
Member   posted 04-15-98 07:28 AM          
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All you need is a microwave leak detector if you're worried about getting fried (along with an off switch). Apart from that I can't see that this is more dangerous than other things such as high pressure reactions or working with very volatile and flammable solvents such as ether, acetone and pet ether. All these have been advocated in the past. Sure - It might not be a good idea to carry out reactions under pressure in a microwave unless you have the (expensive) teflon containers needed - but I think microwave chemistry is the future of clandestine chemistry.
 
Cherrie Baby
Member   posted 04-15-98 07:28 AM          
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All you need is a microwave leak detector if you're worried about getting fried (along with an off switch). Apart from that I can't see that this is more dangerous than other things such as high pressure reactions or working with very volatile and flammable solvents such as ether, acetone and pet ether. All these have been advocated in the past. Sure - It might not be a good idea to carry out reactions under pressure in a microwave unless you have the (expensive) teflon containers needed - but I think microwave chemistry is the future of clandestine chemistry.
 
Fan of Shulgin
Member   posted 04-15-98 10:08 AM          
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I agree that if someone with sufficient skill and knowledge + Savvy were to carry out microwave experiments then there is no problem. I am only trying to discourage those who have not been trained, or at the very least those who have no experience in microwave chemistry from hurting themselves.
Please dont take this the wrong way, but have you had experience in microwave synthesis techniques (I only ask since there are no doubt a lot of people who have jumped on the bandwagon since the New Scientist article was published) - I have practical experience, although not in illegal drug manufacture! Seriously! I would like to stress that again! I DONT MAKE DRUGS!.

I too believe that once microwave chemistry becomes more a part of everyday laboratory work it will be used to a great extent in the labs of the drug makers. I mean, it eliminates the need for solvents in many reactions. Just think of the money that could be saved, as well as the increases in safety!

The fact that it is possible to react two solids in the absence of solvent makes the technique very exciting to me!

But, are you brave enough to risk destroying a perfectly good microwave?


Fan of Shulgin
Member   posted 04-15-98 10:08 AM          
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I agree that if someone with sufficient skill and knowledge + Savvy were to carry out microwave experiments then there is no problem. I am only trying to discourage those who have not been trained, or at the very least those who have no experience in microwave chemistry from hurting themselves.
Please dont take this the wrong way, but have you had experience in microwave synthesis techniques (I only ask since there are no doubt a lot of people who have jumped on the bandwagon since the New Scientist article was published) - I have practical experience, although not in illegal drug manufacture! Seriously! I would like to stress that again! I DONT MAKE DRUGS!.

I too believe that once microwave chemistry becomes more a part of everyday laboratory work it will be used to a great extent in the labs of the drug makers. I mean, it eliminates the need for solvents in many reactions. Just think of the money that could be saved, as well as the increases in safety!

The fact that it is possible to react two solids in the absence of solvent makes the technique very exciting to me!

But, are you brave enough to risk destroying a perfectly good microwave?


Osmium
Member   posted 04-16-98 04:14 AM          
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* But, are you brave enough to risk destroying a perfectly good microwave? *
Yes, yes, definitely YES!


Osmium
Member   posted 04-16-98 04:14 AM          
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* But, are you brave enough to risk destroying a perfectly good microwave? *
Yes, yes, definitely YES!


RatHead
unregistered   posted 04-23-98 10:04 PM           
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The only danger to using a microwave is the eyes believe it or not the eye actually does not have nerves for pain sensors inside. That is really true. That is why if you look at a welder arc or Carbon arc sure you get a residual bright after spot but the pain doesn't show up to later and later and later.
Anyway same for radio frquency so the above warnings aren't out of league.
Stuff aluminum foil or steel wool into cracks and leaks then tape over with a solid metal tape. This tape can be found in many building supplies. It comes in a paper backed roll. It also works great for sealing general air leaks, small vacuum problems, and of course for minimizing heat loss on columns and soxhlet extractors. Just apply it lengthwise leaving a narrow window for viewing. It really speeds up the cycle time.


 
RatHead
unregistered   posted 04-23-98 10:04 PM           
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The only danger to using a microwave is the eyes believe it or not the eye actually does not have nerves for pain sensors inside. That is really true. That is why if you look at a welder arc or Carbon arc sure you get a residual bright after spot but the pain doesn't show up to later and later and later.
Anyway same for radio frquency so the above warnings aren't out of league.
Stuff aluminum foil or steel wool into cracks and leaks then tape over with a solid metal tape. This tape can be found in many building supplies. It comes in a paper backed roll. It also works great for sealing general air leaks, small vacuum problems, and of course for minimizing heat loss on columns and soxhlet extractors. Just apply it lengthwise leaving a narrow window for viewing. It really speeds up the cycle time.