Author Topic: totarol  (Read 2035 times)

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Skink

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totarol
« on: June 16, 2000, 10:26:00 PM »
I'm guessing this is the best place for this one, though it may just be a snipe hunt.  On the old board, a while back, there was a post by a purported Fman alias (assumed due to writing style and content - I don't recall the nick..), where he mentioned totarol in the context of psychoactivity and gave a reference from the Australian Journal of Chemisty  (48: #5 1995).  So I looked it up on my library server and found the articles and it seems that totarol is an extract of some Australian plant (I think.. you yourself can look it up if you want to know) that showed great promise as a new class of antibiotics.  What also caught my eye is that it bore a diterpenoid structure. 
Now, as I mentioned above, this could be entirely useless, but perhaps there is also something to it.  I just thought, before I forgot about this entirely, to throw it out there and see if anyone knows anything else about this molecule or some of the structural variations used in published research.
Skink


Epikur

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Re: totarol
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2000, 02:23:00 AM »
Totarol is a diterpene from Podocarpus nagi and indeed has antibacterial activity (together with about a million other natural substances). There is no reason whatsoever to assume that it is psychoactive.


sinsemillia

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Re: totarol
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2000, 07:54:00 AM »
i think i read some where that some diterpiniods are indeed psychoactive  such as  salvinorin -A
is salvinorin A a diterpiniod


Epikur

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Re: totarol
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2000, 12:01:00 PM »
For salvinorin, see

http://salvia.lycaeum.org/valdes84.html


Just because some diterpenes are psychoactive, not all have to be.