Author Topic: OTC acetyl chloride  (Read 1944 times)

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Natrix

  • Guest
OTC acetyl chloride
« on: October 12, 2004, 12:40:00 PM »
SCl2 and SOCl3 are generated in situ:

S + Cl2 -> SCl2
CH3-COOH + SCl2 + Cl2 -> CH3-COCl + SOCl3 + HCl
CH3-COOH + SOCl3 -> CH3-COCl + SO2 + HCl

V.Auger, A.Behal, Bl. (3) 2, 145 (1889)

and Houben-Weyl VIII, p.475

does this also work with chloroacetic acid?

ApprenticeCook

  • Guest
do you mean to produce chloro-acetylchloride?
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2004, 05:29:00 AM »
do you mean to produce chloro-acetylchloride? by this method? should work via same route and method..... couldnt see why not.... (objections?)

But nice route for acetyl chloride, nice for acetic anhydride req's.

-AC


lugh

  • Guest
Sulfuryl Choride Chlorinations
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2004, 05:34:00 PM »

does this also work with chloroacetic acid?




Yes it does, see

Patent DE146796

,

Patent DE157816

and JACS 61 2142-50 (1939) & 62 925-29 (1940) ;)



8)




yei

  • Guest
could the chlorine be replaced by TCCA?
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2004, 05:09:00 PM »
I notice that there is an HCl generated for every Cl2 consumed. Could this mean that a mixture of S and TCCA would also work?


phenethyl_man

  • Guest
perhaps a foolish question but..
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2004, 03:58:00 PM »
perhaps a foolish question but..  where abouts can elemental sulfur be found over-the-counter?


demorol

  • Guest
perhaps a foolish question but..
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2004, 04:16:00 PM »
perhaps a foolish question but..  where abouts can elemental sulfur be found over-the-counter?


Try gardening stores. Where I live it is sold in 5kg bags. It is used as some kind of plant protection, so the bugs don't eat them. ;)

ApprenticeCook

  • Guest
sulphur is the easy part....
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2004, 11:04:00 PM »
sulphur is the easy part.... chlorine is easy but nasty... so if someone could comment on yei's thought about the replacement of chlorine with TCCA?

-AC


Drug_Phreak

  • Guest
Sulphur can also be found in many brewing...
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2004, 03:39:00 AM »
Sulphur can also be found in many brewing shops as it's used in the wine making process. This sulphur is generally of a high quality too.


jboogie

  • Guest
pharmacy
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2004, 09:08:00 PM »
the first bottle of sulphur swijb got was from the local pharm. i think its sold as a disinfectant, but im not sure of all its prescribed usages.
gardening suppliers also carry it. there are a few devices that vaporize sulphur to inhibit bug reproduction in green houses.


Nicodem

  • Guest
Sulfur
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2004, 01:45:00 AM »
You can buy kilos of sulfur in the gardening store, but not the one for burning and disinfecting with SO2 as that usually comes on paper stripes. You should ask for sulfur for spraying vineyards (I can't remember which fungus it is used against). You might want to purify it though, as it is of very "technical" grade (>80% purity where I live).

Yei: Could this mean that a mixture of S and TCCA would also work?

No. I tried TCCA+S+AcOH time ago. There is a very exothermic reaction and a nasty yellow reaction mixture forms with cyanuric acid precipitate clogging everything. I guess the foul garlicky smell of that yellow stuff is S2Cl2 but as far as I know S2Cl2 does not react with AcOH. Maybe it would work if you use a mixture of AcOH and anhydrous sodium acetete which can react with S2Cl2.


yei

  • Guest
Pharmacies sell "flowers of sulfur",
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2004, 08:05:00 PM »
Pharmacies sell "flowers of sulfur", which is very pure. It's more expensive, of course, but how much AcCl  does one need?

Nicodem, I guess you've tried everything  :)

Once, I mixed TCCA and sulfur to make a smoke mixture. It ended up being a gunpowder.... ::)
So there's definitely a reaction....How does one control whether S2Cl2 or SCl2 is formed?

How does H2SO4 + Ca(OCl)2 sound as a convenient chlorine generator?

There should be some way to avoid the nasty gas, though.