Author Topic: Wanted references  (Read 9108 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

java

  • Guest
Journal Ref. for Indole_amine
« Reply #100 on: November 01, 2004, 08:55:00 AM »
Zirconium Borohydride Piperazine Complex: An Efficient, Air and Thermally Stable Reducing Agent
M. Tajbakhsh, M. M. Lakouraj, F. Shirini, S. Habibzadeh, A. Nikdoost
Tetrahedron Lett. 45 (2004) 16, 3295-3299


Rhodium

  • Guest
Recent GHB Publications
« Reply #101 on: November 01, 2004, 10:20:00 AM »
The following are listed at

http://www.ingenta.com/isis/browsing/TOC/ingenta%3B?issue=pubinfobike%3A//adis/txr/2004/00000023/00000001



Symposium on ?-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB): The Clinical Toxicology of GHB – an Introduction
Toxicological Reviews, 23(1), 1 (2004)
 
?-Hydroxybutyric Acid: Neurobiology and Toxicology of a Recreational Drug
C. Guin Ting Wong; Katherine F.Y. Chan; K. Michael Gibson; O. Carter Snead III
Toxicological Reviews, 23(1), 3-20 (2004)
 
?-Butyrolactone and 1,4-Butanediol: Abused Analogues of ?-Hydroxybutyrate
Robert B. Palmer,
Toxicological Reviews, 23(1), 21-31 (2004)
 
?-Hydroxybutyrate: Bridging the Clinical-Analytical Gap
Cynthia L. Morris-Kukoski,
Toxicological Reviews, 23(1), 33-43 (2004)

The ?-Hydroxybutyrate Withdrawal Syndrome
Asim F. Tarabar; Lewis S. Nelson
Toxicological Reviews, 23(1), 45-49 (2004)



Chimica Oggi has ISSN 0392-839X and it's found at

http://www.teknoscienze.com/co_profile.htm


They do not respond to any inquiries concerning reprints though. Can anyone here get these articles?

Merits of sodium borohydride reductions under phase transfer catalysis. Part I.    
Yadav, Vasanti G.; Yadav, G. D.; Vyas, J. R.
Chimica Oggi (Chemistry Today) 18(6), 39-44 (2000)
____ ___ __ _

Merits of sodium borohydride reductions under phase transfer catalysis. Part II.    
Yadav, Vasanti G.; Yadav, G. D.; Vyas, J. R.
Chimica Oggi (Chemistry Today) 18(7/8), 39-43 (2000)
____ ___ __ _

The reactivity of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in alcoholic solutions
Hennessy SA, Moane SM, McDermott SD, Journal of Forensic Sciences, Vol. 49(6), [10 pages] (2004)
DOI:

10.1520/JFS2003340



Abstract
In this work the stability of GBL (gamma-butyrolactone) and GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyric acid) in alcoholic media was studied. Under acidic conditions the GBL will react with ethanol or methanol to give the corresponding ethyl and methyl esters of GHB. It can be seen that ester formation is dependent on the type of alcohol, the alcohol content of the solution, and the pH of the solution. Under the same conditions it was shown that GHB does not give rise directly to the corresponding ester when merely in the presence of an alcohol; however the ester will be formed if the conditions are present for conversion of GHB to GBL followed by subsequent reaction with alcohol. In alcoholic beverage samples spiked with GBL the expected conversion to GHB occurred, and the formation of the ethyl ester of GHB was also seen in some samples. Wine samples were analyzed for the presence of the ethyl ester of GHB, and the effect of adding GHB/GBL to hot beverages was studied.


fogged

  • Guest
For Rhodium and Java
« Reply #102 on: November 01, 2004, 03:34:00 PM »
For Java:

Zirconium Borohydride Piperazine Complex: An Efficient, Air and Thermally Stable Reducing Agent
M. Tajbakhsh, M. M. Lakouraj, F. Shirini, S. Habibzadeh, A. Nikdoost
Tetrahedron Lett. 45 (2004) 16, 3295-3299




For Rhodium:

Use of GHB Compounds by HIV-Positive Individuals
Alvaro Camacho, Scott Matthews, Joel Dimsdale
American Journal on Addictions 13(2), 120 (2004)



Abstract
Gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has been used by body-builders to enhance performance and by young adults in rave parties. Warnings have been posted about its addictive potential. The use of these dietary compounds is currently banned by the Food and Drug Administration, but they are widely available through the Internet and in certain communities. The purpose of the study was to examine the use of these compounds by HIV-positive individuals and to investigate their knowledge of the addictive potential of GHB and its related dietary compounds. One hundred HIV-positive individuals from the UCSD outpatient HIV clinic responded to an anonymous survey that inquired about their knowledge, use, and effects produced by GHB containing dietary compounds. The most common reported dietary compound beside GHB was Growth Hormone Release Extract (GHRE). Fifty-two percent of individuals reported using at least one GHB containing dietary compound. Gay subjects reported the highest use of GHB compounds (76.9%; p???0.001). The most common effect reported by users was increased energy (71%). Only 24% of the total responders knew about GHB's addictive potential. Among reported users of GHB containing compounds, fourteen (27%) knew about its addictive potential and nine (17%) knew that the compound is illegal. This study shows that HIV-positive gay individuals attending our clinic are using GHB compounds. Reported GHB users have limited knowledge about its addictive potential and serious adverse effects. More controlled studies are needed to evaluate long-term effects of dietary compounds containing GHB, especially among HIV-positive individuals who are actively receiving antiretroviral treatment.

____ ___ __ _

Gamma-Hydroxybutyric Acid: Patterns of Use, Effects and Withdrawal
Karen Miotto, Jack Darakjian, Janice Basch, Shanna Murray, Jennifer Zogg, Richard Rawson
American Journal on Addictions 10(3), 232-241 (2001)



Abstract
Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is gaining popularity as a drug of abuse. Reports of toxicity and lethality associated with GHB use have increased. This survey study was designed to identify patterns of GHB use, its effects, and withdrawal syndrome. A survey inquiring about the effects of GHB was administered to 42 users. The results showed that GHB was used to increased feelings of euphoria, relaxation, and sexuality. Adverse effects occurred more frequently in daily users and polydrug users than in occasional GHB users. Loss of consciousness was reported by 66%, overdose by 28%, and amnesia by 13% of participants during GHB use and by 45% after GHB use. Three daily users developed a withdrawal syndrome that presented with anxiety, agitation, tremor, and delirium. Participants described GHB intoxication as having similarities to sedative-hypnotic or alcohol intoxication. Regular use has been shown to produce tolerance and dependence. Participants dependent on GHB reported using multiple daily doses around the clock. High frequency users appeared at the greatest risk for developing withdrawal delirium and psychosis after abrupt discontinuation of GHB use.

Osmium

  • Guest
ASTM G5-94 (1999)e1; Standard Reference Test...
« Reply #103 on: November 02, 2004, 01:00:00 AM »
ASTM G5-94 (1999)e1; Standard Reference Test Method for Making Potentiostatic and Potentiodynamic Anodic Polarization Measurements

ASTM G3-89 (1999); Standard practise for Conventions Applicable to Electrochemical Measurements in Corrosion Testing


Captain_America

  • Guest
Leminger
« Reply #104 on: November 02, 2004, 11:58:00 AM »
a ref from Karel's translation; Chemicky Prumysl 22, 553 (1972)

Leminger, O.: Polish Pat. PV 3870z (May 25, 1971)

I can't find it on esp@cenet, there are two patents from him that have nothing to do w/ phenetylamines, he seems to have several research interests.

(Karel's voice:) This is Part 1* of Leminger's series "The Chemistry of Alkoxylated Phenethylamines".   It contains a preparation of syringaldehyde by Reimer-Tiemann formylation of 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (33% yield), etherification
of that and other phenols with alkyl iodides (67-81%) and condensation of the resulting benzaldehydes with
nitromethane in ethanolic KOH (55-67%).


*: Leminger, O.: Chem. Prum. 22, 496 (1972)
Could possibly this part be made available too?


gsus

  • Guest
ASTM Section 3, v.03.02
« Reply #105 on: November 04, 2004, 10:03:00 PM »
ASTM G5-94 (1999)e1; Standard Reference Test Method for Making Potentiostatic and Potentiodynamic Anodic Polarization Measurements

ASTM G3-89 (1999); Standard practise for Conventions Applicable to Electrochemical Measurements in Corrosion Testing