Author Topic: Asymmetric reactions  (Read 1050 times)

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uemura

  • Guest
Asymmetric reactions
« on: November 23, 2001, 05:41:00 PM »
May bee of interest for the more theroetical bees...

http://www.bias-net.com/chimica/pdf/chi_dic_stwgurjar.pdf



contains a review divided into the following parts:
- asymmetric oxidation;
- asymmetric hydroboration;
- asymmetric isomerisation;
- asymmetric hydrocyanation;
- asymmetric aldol.


Carpe Die,

Chromic

  • Guest
Re: Asymmetric reactions
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2001, 07:49:00 PM »
These reactions are amazing and so applicable to our area of interest, but unfortunately the catalysts are all but impossible to find outside of industry and academia, and nearly impossible to synthesize from readily available chemicals.  :(

Good read tho!

Rhodium

  • Guest
Re: Asymmetric reactions
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2001, 08:24:00 PM »
There was a synthesis of Jacobsen's catalyst in Journal of Chemical Education recently, and it was directed towards undergraduate students, and it did not seem too hard.

Chromic

  • Guest
Re: Asymmetric reactions
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2001, 02:09:00 AM »
Rhod, this synthesis looks relatively challenging (not so much the chemistry, but the chemical acquisition).



Btw, will manganese acetate act as catalyst for epoxide formation? Or, are there any other more simple ligands which can be used that are not enantioselective?

Osmium

  • Guest
Re: Asymmetric reactions
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2001, 01:32:00 AM »
> are there any other more simple ligands which can be used
> that are not enantioselective?

Probably not quite what you asked for, but do a search for Sharpless epoxidation, which was one of the breakthroughs in enantioselective synthesis.

http://www.scripps.edu/news/press/012100.html


http://www.monomerchem.com/sharplessepoxidation.html