Author Topic: automating production: the use of home-made monochromatic spectrophotometers? -drone  (Read 8121 times)

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PolytheneSam

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Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #20 on: December 01, 2001, 04:02:00 PM »
You'll see bands from all the components of the mixture in the spectrum.  If there's any chemical interaction between the components (such as hydrogen bonding, for example) it would tend to affect the spectrum.  The length (strength) of a band in the spectrum depends on the concentration of the component and path length (among other things) of the sample.  If the concentration is too low and/or the spectrophotometer is not sensitive enough then the bands won't show up for that component.  They teach Beer's Law in Chem101.  The molar extinction coefficient or molar absorptivity seems related.  Note that concentration and path length are factors in the equation.



http://www.geocities.com/dritte123/PSPF.html

PolytheneSam

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #21 on: December 03, 2001, 12:28:00 AM »
Here's something that shows animations of molecular vibrations relating to various spectra bands.

http://www.cem.msu.edu/~parrill/AIRS/



http://www.geocities.com/dritte123/PSPF.html

TrickEMethod

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #22 on: December 10, 2001, 01:15:00 AM »
Would it not make more sense to start somewhat smaller than NMR or spec?  What about temp, pressure, liquid levels, drop counters, colorimeter, conductivity, ph/or specific ion probe monitoring.  All of which could be done using a PC game port or $60 rs232 multi-meter from radioshack and a VB application...

or a palm if you are on the run.

I have a setup like this that runs my reaction controls, but does minimal monitoring.  Mostly I just monitor temp/pressure, drop counting(flaky, but I'm working on it) and liquid levels(flaky, but I really don't need it for anything yet so WGAF).  The software runs my bath pumps/peltiers(about 1deg temp control unless reaction gets really frisky), metering pumps, exhaust fans and rewinds my porn so I'm not interupted.  Who could ask for more?


And on the eight day, God created Meth...
... and hasn't done much of anything usefull since!

UTFSE

  • Guest

   
  
 
 
United States Patent  6,327,398 
Solgaard ,   et al.  December 4, 2001 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Multi-wavelength cross-connect optical switch


Abstract
A cross-connect switch for fiber-optic communication networks employing a wavelength dispersive element, such as a grating, and a stack of regular (non-wavelength selective) cross bar switches using two-dimensional arrays of micromachined, electrically actuated, individually-tiltable, controlled deflection micro-mirrors for providing multiport switching capability for a plurality of wavelengths. Using a one-dimensional micromirror array, a fiber-optic based MEMS switched spectrometer that does not require mechanical motion of bulk components or large diode arrays can be constructed with readout capability for WDM network diagnosis or for general purpose spectroscopic applications.


This is a very small rendition of the guts of a spectrometer
built for intergration into OEM units.

Don't know the price - pretty high probably but this would be the majority of a basic unit. Then interface to your PC.



just glad to bee here-----he he he

UTFSE

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #24 on: December 11, 2001, 02:27:00 AM »

   
  
 
 
United States Patent  6,327,398 
Solgaard ,   et al.  December 4, 2001 


Multi-wavelength cross-connect optical switch


Abstract
A cross-connect switch for fiber-optic communication networks employing a wavelength dispersive element, such as a grating, and a stack of regular (non-wavelength selective) cross bar switches using two-dimensional arrays of micromachined, electrically actuated, individually-tiltable, controlled deflection micro-mirrors for providing multiport switching capability for a plurality of wavelengths. Using a one-dimensional micromirror array, a fiber-optic based MEMS switched spectrometer that does not require mechanical motion of bulk components or large diode arrays can be constructed with readout capability for WDM network diagnosis or for general purpose spectroscopic applications.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inventors:  Solgaard; Olav (Davis, CA); Heritage; Jonathan P. (Davis, CA); Bhattarai; Amal R. (Davis, CA) 
Assignee:  The Regents of the University of California (Oakland, CA) 
Appl. No.:  748025
Filed:  December 21, 2000


Solid state fiber optic spectral grating and sensing miniature devise aka spectrometer.






just glad to bee here-----he he he

UTFSE

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2001, 02:49:00 AM »
These articles appeared in Scientific American:
 
January, 1980. A Homemade Spectrophotometer Scans the Spectrum in a Thirtieth of a Second
Cost:$100+ Difficulty:  Danger 3: (Serious injury possible)  Utility: 

January, 1975. A High School Student Builds a Recording Spectrophotometer
Cost:$100+ Difficulty:  Danger 1: (No hazards)  Utility: 

March, 1974. A New Kind of Spectrohelioscope for Observing Solar Prominences
Cost:$100+ Difficulty:  Danger 2: (Minor injury possible)  Utility: 

July, 1970. How to Construct a Molecular-Beam Apparatus and a Mass Spectrometer
Cost:$100+ Difficulty:  Danger 3: (Serious injury possible)  Utility: 

October, 1968. An Ultraviolet Spectrograph Designed By the Illustrator of This Department
Cost:$100+ Difficulty:  Danger 2: (Minor injury possible)  Utility: 

May, 1968. A Spectrophotometer Is Built for Less Than $75
Cost:$0-100 Difficulty:  Danger 3: (Serious injury possible)  Utility: 

September, 1966. On the Making of an Inexpensive Diffraction-Grating Spectrograph
Cost:$100+ Difficulty:  Danger 3: (Serious injury possible)  Utility: 

April, 1959. How Amateurs Can Build a Simple Magnetic-Resonance Spectrometer
Cost:$100+ Difficulty:  Danger 3: (Serious injury possible)  Utility: 

September, 1958. How a Group of High School Students Constructed a Beta-Ray Spectrometer
Cost:$100+ Difficulty:  Danger 3: (Serious injury possible)  Utility: 

September, 1956. About a Diffraction Grating Spectrograph Made of Materials Costing Under $100
Cost:$0-100


just glad to bee here-----he he he

Greensnake

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2001, 08:48:00 PM »
Well, onna certain auction site right now there's one NMR gear for sale, cheapie - 49$ no reserve.

PrimoPyro

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #27 on: December 13, 2001, 09:34:00 PM »
yellium: In regards to

Post 238432

(yellium: "Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo", Serious Chemistry)
I have contacted the representative of Exstrom, Inc. through email, requesting such information on the persimon. I was told that a price has yet to be set. They will be manufacturing it themselves (its not yet ready) and more information will be coming out soon. He said he'd keep me updated.

                                                 PrimoPyro

Vivent Longtemps la Ruche!

ChemGrrl

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #28 on: December 24, 2001, 09:02:00 AM »
I would think that you could take the reference spectra for what you knew that you put into the reaction to begin with and estimate a wavelength that would change dramatically from inception to completion.  A little bit of tweaking would be necessary the first couple of times running the reaction to find the best wavelength for the pathway chosen.  Ultimately though, since the best solution would be to look for a peak that either appears or disappears, a simple comparison between the control data (before the reaction fires) and the current time data woulbe all that is needed. 

However, the real-world is seldom ideal, and there is likely to be a lot of interference from extra stuff in the mix, coupled with any transient species that are generated during the reaction.  Care would have to be taken to choose a wavelength that would not return a false positive due to these factors.  Much time should be invested in determining these factors before relying too heavily on the data collected for deciding when the reaction is complete.

ChemGrrl

"All I wanted was a Pepsi..."

PolytheneSam

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #29 on: December 29, 2001, 03:20:00 AM »
Maybe we'll be seeing spectrometers on a chip soon.

Infrared micro-spectrometer based on a diffraction grating,
S.H. Kong, D.D.L. Wijngaards, R.F. Wolffenbuttel, pp.88-95

http://www.elsevier.nl/PII/S0924424701005441



Microspectrometer based on a tunable optical filter of porous silicon,
G. Lammel, S. Schweizer, P. Renaud, pp.52-59

http://www.elsevier.nl/PII/S0924424701005398




http://www.geocities.com/dritte123/PSPF.html

UTFSE

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #30 on: January 04, 2002, 08:35:00 PM »
US5695720  

A computer-controlled fluid manipulation and analysis apparatus for chemical, biochemical and clinical analysis, sample preparation, and microscale chemical and biochemical synthesis, having one or more stream selection hubs with multiple ports through which microliter volumes of multiple fluid streams may be accessed, stacked, mixed and otherwise transferred by two or more cooperant pumping systems in a highly repeatable and fully software programmable manner. The inherent or resulting properties of said fluids may be automatically recorded via one or more appropriate electronic detectors and data recording systems. Systems comprised of two or more hubs exhibit higher properties of a flow network, and allow more than one fluid segment to be processed simultaneously. Bi-directional flow may occur in each inter-hub connection, and a plurality of possible transport routes can exist between hubs. This leads to enhanced flexibility in sequential processing of each fluid segment.


just glad to bee here-----he he he

UTFSE

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #31 on: January 04, 2002, 08:40:00 PM »
they are already on a chip. complete with d/a's, diffraction gratings, et al.

Go to espace and do search on "monolithic spectrometers".

they are also already on pc cards that just plug into your laptop and use a fiber optic probe to access data.

just glad to bee here-----he he he

PolytheneSam

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #32 on: January 06, 2002, 01:07:00 AM »
I was looking for some specifications for the RE200B in this post

Post 238042

(PolytheneSam: "Re: automating production: the use of home-made monochromatic spectrophotometers?  -drone", Serious Chemistry)
and found these links.  Its appears the sensor is made up of two back to back crystal sensors (opposing signals) which detect the IR, a field effect transistor for amplification/impedance matching, a resistor for biasing the transistor and a window which has a bandwidth of about 7-14 µm.  Note that 7-14 is a factor of 2 and therefore there would be no need for another filter to filter out diffraction grating orders with this sensor in this band.  The "field of view" of each sensor is at a different angle.  These things seem to be very sensitive, ie. can detect the heat from someone walking in front of (across) it.

explanation of sensor, internal diagram, circuits, testing

http://www.komantech.com/product/re200b.htm



various pyroelectric sensors and specs

http://www.nicera.co.jp/sd/item/sensor/pyro/



price, internal diagram, specs, circuit

http://home.netcom.com/~gtb/sensor/sensor.html



2 pages, specs, diagrams

http://www.ciss.at/DATA/Sensor_RE200B.pdf



specs.

http://www.ciss.co.at/PRODUCTS/KEYCOMP/sensors.html



weather station, shows various circuits and specs

http://www.tubbs.net/EcoPod/proposal2/final

report.pdf

good pictures of devices, need Chinese charactor plug-in

http://www.china-sunny.com/Sensor/Pyroelectric

sensor/Pyroelectric-produce1.htm

Pyroelectric motion detector

http://www.glolab.com/pirparts/pirparts.html



How they work

http://www.glolab.com/pirparts/infrared.html





http://www.geocities.com/dritte123/PSPF.html

UTFSE

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #33 on: January 09, 2002, 11:33:00 PM »
I am sorry for that slight Foxy - I just really want some tangible things and I got overwrought and tried to  force the issue.   Sorry maam!!!!

(thanks Lugh)

LaBTop

  • Guest
Re: automating production: the use of home-made mo
« Reply #34 on: January 14, 2002, 02:02:00 PM »
Tripping the fantastic light beam.

BALTIMORE – A technology originally developed during the NASA Mars program now delivers precise on-line monitoring and control in demanding chemical, petrochemical and pharmaceutical production applications. According to technology developer Brimrose Corp., based here, the FreeSpace AOTF NearInfraRed (NIR) instrument provides the laboratory or plant manager with precise, real-time analytical data about the material flowing through a pipe, or about what is occurring in a reactor or a blender.

The instrument has no moving parts – a major benefit in difficult environments. "For space technology, vibration was a huge problem with moving parts," explained Thomas Borheck of Brimrose. "Our instrument has no moving parts. Once it was working for space, where temperature changes very drastically and there are enormous impacts from G forces and all that, [we discovered] it's applicable for process applications. You can put it right in the plant, right over whatever it is [you want to monitor]."

The instrument works well with polymer, film coating, pharmaceutical, fluid bath dryer and homogeneity monitoring applications, said Borheck. "It can analyze the chemical components on thin film online," he said. "There's no alternative to that. You can use it for anything organic – whatever you can analyze with NIR for organics, you can analyze online."

A key advantage in process applications is the instrument's high speed. According to Borheck, no other technology comes close. And because it provides real-time results, it helps prevent product loss and reduces waste.

In pharmaceutical applications, said Borheck, "it can analyze online every single tablet that is leaving the plant, and check if the chemical component – the active ingredient in the tablet or capsule – is exactly what's supposed to be in there. Or in other chemical applications, you can hook it up to a valve to open or close the value, to adjust, for example, fat content or oil content. So it's for monitoring and control, not just monitoring."

Light entering the instrument is put through an optical device, said Borheck. When the light hits the chemical components – whether they're solids, or fluids or powders – it is reflected off the material. A detector then analyzes the difference between what's been put in and what is put out, in the range between 900 nanometers and 2400 nanometers. It can be placed into a company's overall control system, he added.

For more information about the technology, visit the company's Web site at www.brimrose.com, or contact Borheck via e-mail at tborheck@Brimrose.com.
LT/

WISDOMwillWIN

Bozakium

  • Guest
IR specs, again
« Reply #35 on: April 03, 2002, 09:31:00 PM »
Beez,
  Thanks for the research.
Motion detector circuitry is 5 buck radio shack stuff, the meat is in the spectral scanning. Computer can do the graphing, even that old 386.
   Shit, if they're 2B had used for a few hundred buck, thats the way to go. Run a few test samples and calibrate. Take to repair shop or self repair if electronics are bad. I know of a school that moved its chem dept and just threw out the old ones. (I missed the dumpster due to being away on sabbatical,  :( .)
  If they become available on achip with solid-state variable-wavelength emitter or detector, and no moving parts, the cost could become practical in home labs, otherwise its auction and used equipment shop time.
   For those of you who need a strong permanent magnet for NMR experiments a la science mag articles, cannabalize an old disk drive. you WONT bee dissapointed.
    I'd still like some schematic diagrams and service info, but dont have much online time available yet. Ill keeep ya posted.
--Bz138

ClearLight

  • Guest
SciAm CD ROM Disk
« Reply #36 on: April 10, 2002, 08:03:00 AM »
All of the scientific american amateur scientist articles are on the Scientific american cd rom, put out by the tinker's guild.  The homemade atomsmasher, the xray machine, the gas chromatograph, the mass spectrometer, along with a bunch of tlc and liquid chromatograph articles.  Very searchable, and may even have something on NMR if I recall correctly...

 As to a good sensor, you can order a IC from digikey that has a pin photodiode in it. with a 2.2k ohm resistor across two pins and a 9v battery, it will turn milliwatts of energy to millvolts of electricity on your digital voltmeter... makes a cheap laser power meter, or monospec for under $6.00


Infinite Radiant Light - THKRA

PolytheneSam

  • Guest
links
« Reply #37 on: April 11, 2002, 05:12:00 AM »

quantum

  • Guest
some thoughts from a novice newbee
« Reply #38 on: May 21, 2002, 09:15:00 PM »
well I personaly dont think it would be hard.
in au dicksmiths (i think its radio shack in the US
sell a pcb with parts to make a parralel port io control
card. it takes variable volatage in and out and then
converts it into code on your pc.  it can be run
on say linux with in ioperm C/C++ command or with
a pointer made to the address of your prt port 0x378 what eva.
as far as infra red no go in my consideration as the spectrum is to slow and I dont think it would cut through
thick emulsions. much like sound going through rubber
uv leds and sensors are available the card costs about $50
and the sensors and leds cost about 5 to 10 each.
I have used this in hydro for moving lights about my plants
to the exact location.
so what problems would I have doing this with this info.
hmm well what spec would you need.
well I could work out plank bla particle in a box thingy
but what about emulsions. you have mutiple chemicals with
diffrent orbitals and you dont know were they are or exactly
how much there is.
so I think your code is going to be the hard part.
somthing on the lines of a tree storing all of you wavelenghts for your possible pure chems in it (I dont think
in this situation you want the proccesor to be calculating
plank and quantum on the fly unless you are running
more than one proccessor)
the some sort of algarithem to find out what the possible
mixes are from the reflected and refracted light.
well thinking on this i think that your program would
come up with more than one possible combonation of
chemicals.
I dont know as I am not an expert on chemistry but it is
something I would love to get a grip on and maby
some help on how to work this out would be good.
I personaly belive that if the chemistry side could be figured I could write the code and give you guys schematics
(I have a few schematics on light sensors and pc operated
plc units at home (still in singapore back soon))
and I think we could also make it so any one here could
write in reactions so and make the software open hive code.
maby make everyones life easier and more profitable.
all in all my light sensor and nutrient system ran on a
486 with custom code writen by me.
it had about $100 worth of electronics including relays
and it cost me about $30 for a gass soliniod.
I think you could also get stuff like water solinoids and
gass ones and get them powder coated so as the didont
corode or react.
anyway there just ideas

keep up the good thinking



remeber its not about the drugs mate its about the music
ye right :)

ClearLight

  • Guest
make life easy...
« Reply #39 on: May 22, 2002, 09:13:00 AM »
Use a basic stamp programmable controller board, use rs232 if you want to do a terminal read on the process on the  pc, and let that control everything..all your a2d built in, digital and analog io.. 

www.parallaxinc.com


Infinite Radiant Light - THKRA