Author Topic: From Dallis grass to lysergic acid (in theory)  (Read 722 times)

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El_Zorro

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From Dallis grass to lysergic acid (in theory)
« on: December 29, 2002, 07:17:00 PM »
Ok, so we all want som LSA.  But we all know it'snever gonna happen.  Or will it?  So I was reading TIHKAL, and in the "DMT is everywhere" chapter, Shulgin is in the middle of a long rant about how different varieties of ergot fungi live in a symbiotic relationship with a lot of plants, and when those plants are eaten, the eater can be poisoned, and everybody thinks it's the plant, but in reality, it's the fungi.  So it's an interesting subject, I guess, but then I stumbled across the little part where he says that a plant called Dallis grass, or Paspalum dilatatum, contains a strain of ergot known as Claviceps paspali. 

http://plants.usda.gov/cgi_bin/plant_profile.cgi?symbol=PADI3



Claviceps paspali has a nice little habit of producing paspalic acid when grown in deep water culture.  And paspalic acid can be isomerized to our own little white whale, lysergic acid.

Post 298569

(Neron: "Paspalic acid isomerization to Lysergic acid", Tryptamine Chemistry)


Now, I don't know of any literature giving the yeilds or conditions for culturing Claviceps paspali, but I'd doubt it would be too awfully different from culturing Claviceps purpurea.

Post 18071

(zephler: "Re: Ergot", Tryptamine Chemistry)


I don't have the time or equipment to try and do this, but I'd imagine that if this did work, all a bee would have to do is get some Dallis grass, then throw it in a blender, and use that to inoculate some petri dishes prepared like in

Post 240842

(formula54: "Re: lysergic", Tryptamine Chemistry)
, then use the colonies that grow from that, and use it to inoculate the deep water culture media.  Then extract the mess with some chloroform, then chromatograph.  Or maybe filter the shit out of it, then acidify until the paspalic acid precipitates out.

And of course do everything under photographic red light, preferrably under an inert atmosphere, and not let any of the solution touch your skin.



Does anyone have any thoughts on this?  Could this actually work?