Author Topic: copper(II)nitrate*3H2O from copper(II)nitrate???  (Read 1759 times)

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rookee

  • Guest
copper(II)nitrate*3H2O from copper(II)nitrate???
« on: April 23, 2002, 09:03:00 AM »
SWIM has some copper(II)nitrate and wants to make some copper-chromate catalyst.
but therefor SWIM needs copper(II)nitrate-trihydrate (rhodium's way). Could he just add the exact amount of H2O to get it or isn't it that simple???
thanks in advance...
greets
rookee

Rhodium

  • Guest
trihydrate
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2002, 12:02:00 PM »
The commercial copper nitrate is already the trihydrate. Are you sure yours is anhydrous, I don't think so?

Chromic

  • Guest
What color is your salt?
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2002, 06:28:00 PM »
What color is your salt? The anhydrous inorganic copper salts (ie CuSO4) I've seen are very pale, nearly colorless. The hydrated salts, and copper salts with organic ligands, are usually brilliant colors (eg the emerald color of CuCl2.2H2O, the cobalt blue of CuSO4.5H2O, the blue of Cu(AcAc)2, etc).

rookee

  • Guest
it's blue with a slight greenish touch!
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2002, 09:19:00 PM »
it's blue with a slight greenish touch!
the whole thing is stucked together in the bottle.
(doesn't look anhydrous).
the bottle says copper(II)nitrate!
so i can just use it as if it would be the trihydrate?  ;D
greets

Chromic

  • Guest
Yep!
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2002, 12:43:00 AM »
Yeah, that sounds exactly like the hydrated salt. A quick way to tell is to take maybe 20mg put it on some foil and heat underneath the foil with a lighter. The hydrated salt will crackle as it loses its water and change color.

placebo

  • Guest
You already have the correct one, but I think you ...
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2002, 12:02:00 PM »
You already have the correct one, but I think you want to make copper chromite not chromate.

Bored...

rookee

  • Guest
oops chromite... yes!
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2002, 10:49:00 PM »
yes, copper chromite. sorry  :P