Author Topic: ghetto suction for vacuum filtration  (Read 4702 times)

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ApprenticeCook

  • Guest
ctrl+c & ctrl+p
« Reply #20 on: August 14, 2004, 12:43:00 PM »
Easy as 1,2,3.....

Anyway... the above aspirators are very good and very cheap so they are excellent for many applications, one swim has seen got to 27"Hg on tap pressure (which was quite low in the particular area) so they are excellent.

For vacuum filtration you only need a small vacuum (most times) so the hand pump is quite ok here... but just another aspirator on a slow tap would be sufficient.

As for ghetto there have been a few threads on making aspirators so utfse for that information.
As for an NRV as seen in these aspirators, they can be bought from car part stores for vacuum purposes in the car (i think they call them vacuum isolators?) so thats an easy way to make yourself an aspirator with and NRV inline...

-AC


Shane_Warne

  • Guest
As for an NRV as seen in these aspirators,...
« Reply #21 on: August 14, 2004, 03:11:00 PM »
As for an NRV as seen in these aspirators, they can be bought from car part stores for vacuum purposes in the car (i think they call them vacuum isolators?) so thats an easy way to make yourself an aspirator with and NRV inline...

An en-ar wot?  ;D

I think you could be right about the automotive industry. I saw a website that refered to a device that sounded like a bernoulli principle driven vacuum.
But when I chased it up, I thought they were talking about an overly large interpretation of the device - maybe not.


Venturi adapter/fitting might turn up the treasure.  :)

ApprenticeCook

  • Guest
i dont know what they call them but its a...
« Reply #22 on: August 15, 2004, 05:14:00 AM »
i dont know what they call them but its a little inline thing for the vacuum pipes in your car...
i have a few they fit 8-14mm tube and have a cylinder in the middle of the 2 pipe fittings, in which there is a little rubber circle that presses up against a stopper when air (is from vacuum being drawn through) is being sucked toward the vacuum source and allows the flow, however when you reverse the flow (ie suckback) the stopper is not at the other end and is pushed back immediatly and covers the hole at the other end, preventing loss of vacuum...
Oeverall size is 2.5" long (including tube connections) and 1" diameter.

They would not hold under chemical abuse so a catch system to filter anything off is required....

I thought thats what the packet said, but i cant remember accuratly, it was a while ago, you buy them in single blister packs from major auto stores...

-AC


Shane_Warne

  • Guest
Venturi Tee. I've found PVC and Copper, which...
« Reply #23 on: August 16, 2004, 04:32:00 PM »
Venturi Tee.

I've found PVC and Copper, which I already had, but thought they were unsuitable.

A PVC venturi tee, plus PVC tubing nozzles should make something similar to noj's.

I just hope the constriction is smooth on the inside of the finished product.

biffman

  • Guest
I believe it is called a PCV valve.
« Reply #24 on: August 22, 2004, 05:14:00 PM »
I believe that the one way valve for automobiles that you are talking about is called a PCV valve.  Which stands for Positive Crankcase Ventilation (or something very similar). It only allows flow of air in one direction and is a simple but basic part of the engine's overall emission reduction equipment.
  They are extremely cheap to buy in almost any automotive parts supply place.

Shane_Warne

  • Guest
biffman, that's the solution. thanks!
« Reply #25 on: August 23, 2004, 06:52:00 PM »
biffman, that's the solution. thanks!

I've seen PVC vavles (well, 2min ago) and that's exactly what I've been looking for.

There's some straight ones, and some Tee-shaped ones, depending on the make of car, by the sounds of it.

I wonder if you can use a Y-piece to run two aspirators off a single pump, and combine the vacuum with another Y-piece after the vacuum nozzles?

biffman

  • Guest
Don't know for sure
« Reply #26 on: August 23, 2004, 08:13:00 PM »
I have never used PCV valves for any sort of vacuum so I don't know how much pressure difference they will be able to seal against.  But they are so cheap to buy it's easily determined.  One note; if you want to use a used PCV valve to check it give it a shake.  You should hear a clicking inside like something moving back and forth.  This is good.  If you don't hear anything moving back and forth inside it is probably no good and should be replaced. I think they're $5-$10 (at most) at the auto supply store.
  If you do hook one up for lab work post your results here.    I'd like to know how well they can hold a vacuum.

biffman

  • Guest
By the way it's PCV not PVC
« Reply #27 on: August 23, 2004, 08:18:00 PM »
The valve itself is referred to as a PCV valve which means Positive Crankcase Ventilation (I believe) not PVC which stands for Poly Vinyl Chloride.
  Althugh the housing of a PCV valve may very well be composed of PVC, asking for the valve by the proper name (a PCV valve please)at the parts supplier makes you look more edumacated.

Shane_Warne

  • Guest
The only problem is by the looks of it, is...
« Reply #28 on: August 24, 2004, 05:29:00 AM »
The only problem is by the looks of it, is that there's so many different types for different car models.

they also probably come in one size for the specific car.

The valve is going to cause turbulance with the flow of water, but maybe itll work alright. Especially temporarily.

those PCV's look like they'd be good fittings for vacuum drying too.

anyway thanks for the info biffman, and you too for posting those pictures ozmosis and AP...I'd like to thank God, my mother, for making this vacuum source possible.

ApprenticeCook

  • Guest
use the pcv after a catch system so only air...
« Reply #29 on: August 24, 2004, 09:50:00 AM »
use the pcv after a catch system so only air travels through it otherwise you will start to corrode it...

my nrv (what i call them... pcv equiv) is right next to the aspirator so its after a filter system to prevent its demise...

Just a thought in system design.
-AC


Snakebyte

  • Guest
If you already have a fridge compressor I...
« Reply #30 on: September 01, 2004, 12:21:00 AM »
If you already have a fridge compressor I would use that.  It is great for filtration as it should suck 27-28" and its almost silent.  Swim's has 2 wires of which would be attatched to an ordinary plug for a 110 outlet(doesn't matter which is hot and ground as it is AC).  Since they don't have switches you'll have to wire one in on 1 of the wires.