Author Topic: thermometer stuck!  (Read 2470 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

superman

  • Guest
thermometer stuck!
« on: August 01, 2004, 01:37:00 PM »
it's stuck in a rubber stopper,   i need to push it further so it will reach into the HI in a flask so i can determine BP (lost digis).   i got the vapour up to 115c or so,   but the HI isn't fuming so i assume i must go higher....    anyways off topic, how do i remove this bitch?

KidCurry

  • Guest
Cut the stopper up with a knife, they're cheap
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2004, 01:52:00 PM »
Cut the stopper up with a knife, they're cheap so just get a new one.

lugh

  • Guest
Push It Harder
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2004, 02:54:00 PM »
Using leather gloves to protect your hands, lubricate the thermometer and place the shorter end of the protruding thermometer in the stopper on a piece of wood such as a bench; then push on the stopper until it comes loose  :)  If you can come up with an appropriately sized piece of hollow plastic such as pvc pipe; use that to push with  ;)


superman

  • Guest
thx guys, good ideas!
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2004, 03:31:00 PM »
thx guys, good ideas!

i think i'll chop the bitch though since i don't want to risk being thermometerless tonight :)

Osmium

  • Guest
Use glycerine or similar lubricant, oils don't
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2004, 02:24:00 AM »
Use glycerine or similar lubricant, oils don't work very well with some rubbers.
Definitely use leather gloves or a towel to protect your hand, I've seen a broken glass overhead stirrer rod pushed through someones hand and it didn't look pretty.


goiterjoe

  • Guest
definitely use gloves
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2004, 07:05:00 PM »
the worst lab accident I ever had was from trying to do what you just described, which resulted in me slamming a broken thermometer completely through my hand between the index and middle finger.  It took forever and a day to heal. 

Don't use mineral oil, as it seems to interact with certain rubber stoppers and causes them to stick to whatever is passed through them.  Petroleum jelly seems to work well.


ApprenticeCook

  • Guest
I have done the same thing with a glass pipete
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2004, 06:28:00 AM »
I have done the same thing with a glass pipete and pipete filler... always hold it by the point closest to the point of pressure....

i still have the scar on my hand where it went in and came out.... belive me it hurts like an ass....

Just bee carefull.
-AC


EvilMadChemist

  • Guest
i remeber watching the Lab safety videos in my
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2004, 07:29:00 AM »
i remeber watching the Lab safety videos in my Chemisty Class. this was one of the biggiest things it went over was sticking stuff in the rubber , and how easy the stuff just breaks.

MadMunkey

  • Guest
yea, thats some sick shit seeing blood go...
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2004, 11:34:00 AM »

superman

  • Guest
aw fuck you guys are making me cringe!!!!
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2004, 01:38:00 PM »
aw fuck you guys are making me cringe!!!!    i ended up cutting the stopper.   but now i'm considering trying to use this sliced stopper instead of a new one (which i do have).   the slice i made is very clean,  the stopper appeas to have a perfect seal still!!!   i'm going to try distilling some water with it right now and if it holds up i'll even try it with HI!!!!    would certainly be a good reason for my to hold off on buying ground glass a bit longer.

calcium

  • Guest
no rush...
« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2004, 02:56:00 PM »
No need to buy proper glassware if you haven't been  poisoned or maimed by your current 'lab'. At least not yet.

Yes, I am being sarcastic.

goiterjoe

  • Guest
what's improper about a rubber stopper?
« Reply #11 on: August 03, 2004, 03:08:00 PM »
I've had much better luck getting a good seal with rubber stoppers than I have with glass adapters.  They are also more lenient towards the use of digital thermometers as well, which is all I ever used after the impaled hand incident.