Author Topic: Have i found gold? Assesing a chemical supplier...  (Read 2505 times)

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Quality

  • Guest
Have i found gold? Assesing a chemical supplier...
« on: August 12, 2004, 12:38:00 AM »
Assessing a chemical supplier?
I have stumbled across a company that supplies immediate precursors in small quantity; they seem to be small but legitimate.
Does anyone have any suggestions on how to asses chemical supplier reliability, is it possible that i might have found what i have.

Unfortunately, I can’t give any more details being this could be a true rarity and i cannot compromise it in arrogance.

             i need advise,
                    thanks

biotechdude

  • Guest
Its hard...
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2004, 02:28:00 AM »
Its hard...

Look in Industry Directories, phone books, old webpages that mention them.  Try and find out who there (legitimate) customers are and ask them.  Send the supplier an email, phone them etc and ask intelligent legitimate questions (before contacting them as a bee).  Place an order for a non-watched item to get an idea of their business acumen and any strange behaviour or delays.

Keep in mind though that LE can fabricate all these avenues to give bees the feeling of safety and legitimacy.

jesus_verga

  • Guest
you may have gold....
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2004, 03:16:00 AM »
or a DEA sting operation. (Some hivers may remember "Buckeye Scientific" back in the late 1970's and more recently Science Alliance).

Years ago, SWIJV jumped on a too good to be true deal from a local chemical reseller...video of his purchases was provided to local sheriff's narcotics enforcement unit. (No list 1 or 2 chems- but some highly suspect CSA's and a lot of GBL). Sheriff's office and DA tried to get SWIJV for manufacturing in spite of total lack of precursors, glassware or finished product. (Still SWIJV got a year in county for some Ritalin found when his home was searched).

Another time, SWIJV clicked on a Google-sponsored link and found a Science lab supplier  too good to be true...all kinda list ones and twos ...already finished C-IV's like lorazepam and pemoline and pseudo!. Their site's "About me" was copied from the old  Science Alliance:
"--------.com is dedicated to the sale of high quality laboratory chemicals for research,education and industry. Individuals, educational institutions, and businesses can shop quickly and easily at --------.com". They are also located in the same state.

SWIJV ordered reagents (nothing List or 2, just a watched item) from these clowns and got stiffed. The Science lab supplier would not answer e-mails or returns calls. SWIJV got the intuition that he gave money to thieves/ DEA rats. Luckily SWIJV didn't get busted this time and was able to charge back the amount he was beaten for to his CC.

Be careful...if you really thought this was a good idea, would you have posted us about it?

amine

  • Guest
hah jesus is right, becareful of ordering such
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2004, 04:25:00 PM »
hah jesus is right, becareful of ordering such things. Especially in the god US of A. haha sciencelab, lol, I always thought it was the same company as Sci ally.

Drug_Phreak

  • Guest
Yeah... beecareful. I would be willing to put...
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2004, 01:24:00 PM »
Yeah... beecareful. I would be willing to put money on it that a certain chemical supplier, which offers their chemicals for sale on a major auction website is a sting operation.


Stonium

  • Guest
There's a cliche we use around here as a basic
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2004, 08:40:00 PM »
There's a cliche we use around here as a basic rule of thumb: If it sounds too good to be true, then it most likely is. An especially applicable statement in the area of clandestine chemi, I'd say.  8)

or a DEA sting operation. (Some hivers may remember "Buckeye Scientific" back in the late 1970's and more recently Science Alliance).
Hmm. Do us both a favor, please. Don't make implications about subjects you (obviously) know little if anything, about. If you're going to post something, stick to facts rather than regurgitating gossip overheard at alt.drugs.chemistry...or wherever.

Sci-Ally WAS NOT a DEA sting operation.

Got/That?,
Stoni



TrypNballZium

  • Guest
stone on da $
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2004, 08:45:00 PM »
if what you want is seemingly handed to you on a silver platter..RUN!

stupid people DO NOT survive in this game very long.

"they" count on us beeing lazy, greedy, impatient etc.

do your best to avoid these and other potentially hazzardous qualities of character.

a good rule of thumb for the newbee should bee: If it aint a pain in the ass, im not interested!

not that there's not "gold" out there, there most certainly is, but you have to pan for it, or dig it out of the ground. If someone is standing on the street corner HANDING it to you, that should bee your que that something just aint right.

get it?

got it?

good.

;)


jesus_verga

  • Guest
Sci-Ally WAS NOT a DEA sting operation.
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2004, 01:40:00 AM »

Sci-Ally WAS NOT a DEA sting operation...




Stonium, prudence dictates that one would not attempt sourcing from a vendor who had just been busted by DEA. It was not my intent to cast aspersions on Mr. Strike's charactor.


psychokitty

  • Guest
Just for good measure . . .
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2004, 11:56:00 AM »
I'll second that:

Sci-Ally WAS NOT a DEA sting operation!!!

Nobody is going to bust you if you're doing legitimate scientific research with everything that you legally purchase (and, as a normal everyday citizen, are legally entitled to possess).  The only way to prove that you are up to no good--assuming that you're up to no good--is by what you say or do in public (to people or to yourself), what you say on the phone, what you type on your computer, what you put in your trash, and, in terms of any questionable activities, what people directly see, hear, smell, taste or feel.

These suggestions about people getting busted for purchasing somewhat suspicious items--without any additional evidence to support the notion that an actual crime is being committed--are unfounded, in my opinion.

Read Strike's book, "Sources" for more information.  It very thoroughly covers the topic in question.

jesus_verga

  • Guest
Sci-Ally WAS NOT a DEA sting operation!!!
« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2004, 01:07:00 AM »

EvilMadChemist

  • Guest
i know of only 1 chemical place that is not a...
« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2004, 11:01:00 AM »

Sedrick

  • Guest
Real or Unreal, that is the question
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2004, 03:01:00 AM »
I remember a sting operation a few years back. It was a southern European company offering a fairly selective range of listed chemicals in ridiculous amounts. The prices were obscene but the miimum purchase order was of the order of several hundred dollers. This looked suspicious, I must admit. A guy named DiethylEtherMan placed an order on a drum of safrole. He started complaining bitterly though when no product was delivered to him and the company stopped replying to his emails. Because of the way he paid for it, there was no possibility of a refund either. This story is probably not much use to the thread poster but is still an interesting case of the type of events that can happen. In this world we live in, every nigger is trying to make a buck. I think the operation was designed to steal peoples money, and was not an elaborate web woven by a law enforcement agency to net criminals.

How badly do you want these particular chemicals?
Are there any penalties for getting caught?
Are you prepared to take the associated risks?
Can you afford the cost of these chemicals?
Have you chosen the right product and/or quantity?
Have you compared the prices with other companies?
Are they prepared to deliver to private indivduals?

The above questions are designed to make you think about the nature of what you are getting yourself into. Noone can answer if the company is real or not so you are just going to have to act intuitively and use your discretion.