Author Topic: Professional Chemistry Links  (Read 15611 times)

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wirewound

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the best place to search
« Reply #40 on: October 18, 2002, 04:57:00 PM »
THE "VIRTUAL" ~ CHEMISTRY CENTER  chemical

 

http://www-sci.lib.uci.edu/HSG/GradChemistry.html#CHEMICALS




Links for Chemists

http://www.liv.ac.uk/Chemistry/Links/links.html



  


the virtual Bioscience


http://www-sci.lib.uci.edu/HSG/GradBioscience.html



:)  ;D  ;)  :-[  8)  ::)  :(  >:(  :o  :P

GC_MS

  • Guest
NMR
« Reply #41 on: October 19, 2002, 12:45:00 AM »
Basics of NMR:

http://www.cis.rit.edu/htbooks/nmr/



WOMAN.ZIP: Great Shareware, but be careful of viruses...

GC_MS

  • Guest
Named compounds and reagents
« Reply #42 on: October 21, 2002, 11:10:00 AM »
Ever wondered what Meerwein salt and Hünig's base are?

http://www.chem.wisc.edu/areas/reich/handouts/NameReagents/namedreag-cont.htm



geh in die knie. wackle mit den hueften. klatsch in die haende. und tanz den mussolini.

PolytheneSam

  • Guest
First posted by java.
« Reply #43 on: January 12, 2003, 10:55:00 PM »

foxy2

  • Guest
IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology
« Reply #44 on: February 08, 2003, 04:48:00 AM »
IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology
This online version of the IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology corresponds to the second edition (1997), compiled by Alan D. McNaught and Andrew Wilkinson (Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK).

http://www.iupac.org/publications/compendium/index.html




AcroMed biomedical acronym database
AcroMed is a computer generated database of biomedical acronyms and the associated long forms extracted from the last year of Medline abstracts (2001).

http://gungadin.cs.brandeis.edu/~weiluo/main3.htm


foxy2

  • Guest
Electronic Journal Miner
« Reply #45 on: February 08, 2003, 05:05:00 AM »
Electronic Journal Miner
This is really cool.

http://ejournal.coalliance.org/




KartOO Search Engine
Neat little search engine.

http://www.kartoo.com/


java

  • Guest
The National Institute of Standards and Technology
« Reply #46 on: February 11, 2003, 04:37:00 PM »
NIST Chemistry WebBook
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Chemistry WebBook provides chemical and physical property data for a variety of compounds. The data are from collections maintained by the NIST Standard Reference Data Program and outside contributors.  Please check your software compatibility from the plug-in information before drawing a structure
It is available free.

http://www.chemweb.com/databases/webbook


thallium

  • Guest
Merck's ChemDAT online
« Reply #47 on: February 17, 2003, 10:44:00 PM »
Merck's ChemDAT online:

http://www.merck.de/english/services/chemdat/english/index.htm



useful for looking up chemicals, and safety data sheets. Free copy of the whole thing is avaliable on CD.


java

  • Guest
Microwave chemistry and other tools
« Reply #48 on: February 26, 2003, 12:44:00 AM »
Sorry if it's a repeat reference, I found it resourceful and interesting with articles on Microwave chemistry, and some  other tools.

http://www.cyf-kr.edu.pl/~pcbogdal/




PolytheneSam

  • Guest
IPC
« Reply #49 on: March 14, 2003, 03:04:00 AM »
International Patent Classification (IPC). 
This page gives a good explanation of the classifiaction system.

http://www.patentsonline.com.au/patent/pipccode.html



Classification:

http://www.wipo.org/classifications/fulltext/new_ipc/index.htm



See also

Post 264778

(PolytheneSam: "Re: Professional Chemistry Links", Methods Discourse)



java

  • Guest

java

  • Guest
Journals, science search , cold fusion?
« Reply #51 on: March 23, 2003, 06:17:00 PM »
Entry to chemistry sources , but then you'll find much more...

http://www.world.std.com/~mica/cftlt.html


see also a complete list of journals, chem included
at........

http://www.ch.ic.ac.uk/..........then

select e-journals from side bar

and a good science search engine at .......

http://www.psigate.ac.uk/


and a good chem guide helps the newbee understand chemistry........

http://www.chemguide.co.uk/index.html#top


enjoy the contents.....java


java

  • Guest
Chiral separation by HPLC
« Reply #52 on: March 27, 2003, 06:35:00 PM »
This is a good listing of chromatographic representation of many compounds with chiral separationby HPLC

http://www.registech.com/chiral/chiralappl.html




java

  • Guest
Glossary for Organic Chemistry terms and .....
« Reply #53 on: April 20, 2003, 04:31:00 AM »
GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED IN
PHYSICAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

(IUPAC Recommendations 1994)

http://www.chem.qmul.ac.uk/iupac/gtpoc/

    glossary to organic and bio terms and words


Rhodium

  • Guest
chemical data files
« Reply #54 on: April 26, 2003, 07:55:00 PM »

Rhodium

  • Guest
http://www.neurotransmitter.net
« Reply #55 on: June 18, 2003, 12:09:00 AM »
Go to

http://www.neurotransmitter.net

right away this instant - it is a great information resource of collected and sorted abstracts, one could say that it is kind of like the Neuroscience/Neuropharmacology answer to my own Psychoactive Synthesis archive - it is also a one-man project.

From the description of the site:

Neurotransmitter.net is a unique project involving research from the fields of neuroscience, neuropsychology, psychiatry, genetics, and others. The sole creator of Neurotransmitter.net is Shawn Thomas. By compiling and sorting dozens of abstracts on specific topics, I seek to introduce a context to research articles that cannot easily be obtained while reading individual abstracts. When an abstract is viewed in context, I believe that an individual has a greater chance of understanding that information in relation to similar research produced by other sources. Neurotransmitter.net is in part an experiment to determine the usefulness of using HTML to organize and present large amounts of scientific information through the medium of the Internet.

Many of the pages on Neurotransmitter.net may also serve as general reviews on various topics. Because the details of research efforts are often difficult to condense into just a few words, abstract compilations may offer more comprehensive reviews of complex subjects like the genetics of bipolar disorder. Unlike published reviews, pages on Neurotransmitter.net may be updated to reflect the consistently changing nature of the neurosciences. I do not intend to attempt to include every possible article on each page; PubMed is available to those who demand such a database.

The intended audience of this site includes anyone interested in the material chosen for the site. I hope that the research community will embrace Neurotransmitter.net and the concept behind it.

java

  • Guest

java

  • Guest
International Critical Tables of chemistry.......
« Reply #57 on: June 28, 2003, 12:42:00 AM »
International Critical Tables of Numerical Data, Physics, Chemistry and Technology (1st Electronic Edition)                  


http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/en/




GC_MS

  • Guest
Named things in chemistry and physics
« Reply #58 on: July 13, 2003, 02:08:00 PM »
Named things in chemistry and physics

http://www.chem.yorku.ca/NAMED/



Don't forget to check out the "Interesting Anecdotes of Chemists"


LaBTop

  • Guest
Electro chemistry
« Reply #59 on: July 13, 2003, 11:17:00 PM »

http://www.l-chem.com/Product_Description.htm


Cell-Design is a comprehensive software package for computer-aided design of electrochemical cells. The software provides complete simulation of electrochemical cells with user specified geometry, chemistry, and operating conditions. The software is specifically designed for personal computers and workstations running under Windows 95, 98, 2000 and NT.

http://www.l-chem.com/Examples.htm


STRIP (REEL-TO-REEL) PLATING :

http://www.l-chem.com/Papers/Reel-to-reel%20%28moving%20strip%29%20plating.pdf

  Reel-to-reel (moving strip) plating.

I'm thinking of a copper bandolier which can be plated with Pd or Pt. In many wackers you could offer the cut pieces of copper strip plated with your catalyst of choice to solute in acidic environment, leaving the Pd or Pt as the catalyst behind.
The deposit builds up from zero thickness at the strip entry into the cell, to the final thickness of 34 µm at the strip exit (upper left), for a strip velocity of 0.3 m/s.(30 cm per SECOND!)
This technique will get you :
Micro-scale roughness and dendrites formation on resistive moving strip.
Detailed roughness build-up on sub mm and micron scales RRW (reel-to reel)

Perhaps even Kevlar or any strong carbon strip material could be found to be plated!  LT/