Author Topic: Searching the "Chemical literature" -Alchemy  (Read 880 times)

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dormouse

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Searching the "Chemical literature" -Alchemy
« on: April 19, 2000, 07:27:00 PM »

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Author  Topic:   Searching the "Chemical literature" 
Alchemy
Hive Bee   posted 02-09-2000 11:12 AM           
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What is the easiest and cheapest way to search the "Chemical Literature" nowadays for a private person living a distance from an Univertsity Library.
In the beginning of eighties We looked up manually in books.
If someone don't want to broadcast on "The Internet" my E-mail adress is alkemist_111@hotmail.com
Sincerely
Alchemy
 
Teonanacatl
Hive Bee   posted 02-10-2000 04:59 PM           
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look at Rhodium's links page, there are a couple leads there to online searches, including some nice patents and possibly you could get a hold of beilstein????
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'Oh, you can't help that' said the Cat: 'we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.' 'How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice. 'You must be,' said the Cat, 'or you wouldn't have come here.'


 
Alchemy
Hive Bee   posted 02-12-2000 05:57 PM           
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Yes I have look at the websites.
But it is newer literature from the last decades. For home chemistry or clandestine chemistry older literature is more usefull
(ninetieth century).
Sincerely
Alchemy
 
tao
Hive Bee   posted 02-12-2000 08:51 PM           
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ninetieth century
wow i want some of those too i'll be about 7000 years ahead of my time.
 
rev drone
Hive Bee   posted 02-20-2000 05:17 AM           
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Definately, the best way I've found is the electronic databases. Beilstein crossfire, if you can get it, kicks ass. Likewise, Medline, a number of scientific databases provided through OVID, esp. Current Contents, are good. Chemical Abstracts' electronic version is nice, but DAMN its spendy.
Also, another nice source is literary reviews: there are some great books out there covering things like enolate chemistry, Grignard reagents, halogenations, hydrogenations, organic electrochemistry: you name it. These are quite nice, since they usually have a nice technical intro to various topics, plus a typically robust bibliography.

Chemical information technology and management is a field in itself. There are both undergrad and graduate courses available detailing it, not to mention its own journal publications, and new book titles devoted to it every year.

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-the good reverend drone

Ipsa scientia potestas est


 
rev drone
Hive Bee   posted 02-21-2000 05:53 AM           
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Before I forget, "LaRock's Comprehensive Organic Transformations", price not withstanding, should be on every organic chemists bookshelf. It is a massive work, listing references for thousands of different organic transformations with thousands of different reagents.
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-the good reverend drone

Ipsa scientia potestas est